Uber Drivers Forum banner

1 - 20 of 120 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,142 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

https://qz.com/1055050/uber-is-test...er-that-lets-drivers-choose-where-they-drive/

Uber is experimenting with giving a key decision-making power to drivers, making good on its "be your own boss" tagline.

The ride-hailing company is testing a "drop-off area filter" that lets drivers choose where they go. "We will only send you trips that have a drop-off location within the areas you have selected," reads a message introducing the feature, which was shared by drivers in multiple online forums. "The more areas you select, the more trips you'll likely get. And you can update your preference at any time."

Uber confirmed to Quartz that it is conducting a "small" test of the drop-off area filter. A spokesman declined to specify where the feature is being tested but said the drop-off zones drivers can opt into are large swaths of a city rather than individual neighborhoods. Drivers on Reddit reported spotting the feature in Boston and Toronto. "We are committed to our mission of reliable transportation, everywhere for everyone," the spokesman said in an emailed statement.

More than 2 million people drive for Uber worldwide and more than 600,000 in the US. The company hires these drivers as independent contractors and advertises the flexibility that they get by working on the Uber platform. But while drivers have long had control over their hours-they can sign on and off Uber freely-they've historically had little to no control over where Uber's routing algorithms take them.

Uber doesn't tell drivers where the drop-off is before they accept an incoming ride request. The company has said it does this to prevent drivers from discriminating against passengers heading to poorer and less accessible neighborhoods, which have historically been underserved by the taxi industry. The system can frustrate drivers, especially when a ride takes them far from other prospective customers.

Giving drivers more control over their destinations could go a long way toward addressing this pain point. Quartz reported Aug. 15 that Uber is also testing a "long trip" feature that warns drivers when a ride is likely to last over an hour.

Uber has committed to improving its frayed relations with drivers. In late June, the company debuted a sweeping campaign to improve the driver experience, titled "180 Days of Change." As part of that Uber added a tipping option to its rides and food-delivery apps and tweaked its ratings system so that riders are asked to justify when they leave a driver less than five stars.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,963 Posts

https://qz.com/1055050/uber-is-test...er-that-lets-drivers-choose-where-they-drive/

Uber is experimenting with giving a key decision-making power to drivers, making good on its "be your own boss" tagline.

The ride-hailing company is testing a "drop-off area filter" that lets drivers choose where they go. "We will only send you trips that have a drop-off location within the areas you have selected," reads a message introducing the feature, which was shared by drivers in multiple online forums. "The more areas you select, the more trips you'll likely get. And you can update your preference at any time."

Uber confirmed to Quartz that it is conducting a "small" test of the drop-off area filter. A spokesman declined to specify where the feature is being tested but said the drop-off zones drivers can opt into are large swaths of a city rather than individual neighborhoods. Drivers on Reddit reported spotting the feature in Boston and Toronto. "We are committed to our mission of reliable transportation, everywhere for everyone," the spokesman said in an emailed statement.

More than 2 million people drive for Uber worldwide and more than 600,000 in the US. The company hires these drivers as independent contractors and advertises the flexibility that they get by working on the Uber platform. But while drivers have long had control over their hours-they can sign on and off Uber freely-they've historically had little to no control over where Uber's routing algorithms take them.

Uber doesn't tell drivers where the drop-off is before they accept an incoming ride request. The company has said it does this to prevent drivers from discriminating against passengers heading to poorer and less accessible neighborhoods, which have historically been underserved by the taxi industry. The system can frustrate drivers, especially when a ride takes them far from other prospective customers.

Giving drivers more control over their destinations could go a long way toward addressing this pain point. Quartz reported Aug. 15 that Uber is also testing a "long trip" feature that warns drivers when a ride is likely to last over an hour.

Uber has committed to improving its frayed relations with drivers. In late June, the company debuted a sweeping campaign to improve the driver experience, titled "180 Days of Change." As part of that Uber added a tipping option to its rides and food-delivery apps and tweaked its ratings system so that riders are asked to justify when they leave a driver less than five stars.
I can wait till they get that to my city.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,044 Posts
How is selecting "drop off areas" a way of selecting where you work? Wouldn't selecting "pickup areas" make more sense?
You already have that by just being online where you want to do pick-ups.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,296 Posts
You already have that by just being online where you want to do pick-ups.
False
When I'm sitting in the areas I want to work and I'm getting ride requests 20 to 25 minutes away, 2 towns away ... that's not working the area I want to work.
And I don't want to hear, "but just don't accept those ride requests Kalee. You will not be deactivated for low acceptance rate."

No, you won't be deactivated anymore. But the lower your acceptance rate, the fewer and fewer requests Uber allows to go through to you.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,591 Posts
So Uber used to advertise that they operate everywhere and don't discriminate..

Now they put in a feature that allows drivers to avoid working everywhere and essentially discriminate. Hm.
I'm pretty sure Uber will be careful how they set up areas you can choose to drive to. From the story: "A spokesman declined to specify where the feature is being tested but said the drop-off zones drivers can opt into are large swaths of a city rather than individual neighborhoods."

I can see the feature being helpful in many areas. For example, here in South Florida many drivers in Broward County (north of Miami) don't like to get rides into Miami because they don't know the area, and they face a long deadhead back home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,708 Posts
I'm pretty sure Uber will be careful how they set up areas you can choose to drive to. From the story: "A spokesman declined to specify where the feature is being tested but said the drop-off zones drivers can opt into are large swaths of a city rather than individual neighborhoods."

I can see the feature being helpful in many areas. For example, here in South Florida many drivers in Broward County (north of Miami) don't like to get rides into Miami because they don't know the area, and they face a long deadhead back home.
So when a majority of drivers start ignoring the Bronx and Brooklyn south and etc.. that isn't redlining?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
477 Posts
False
When I'm sitting in the areas I want to work and I'm getting ride requests 20 to 25 minutes away, 2 towns away ... that's not working the area I want to work.
And I don't want to hear, "but just don't accept those ride requests Kalee. You will not be deactivated for low acceptance rate."

No, you won't be deactivated anymore. But the lower your acceptance rate, the fewer and fewer requests Uber allows to go through to you.
And how do you know this for sure? Do you know the algorithm?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,168 Posts
The thing that jumps out at me...

Is the figure 600,000 drivers in the US...8O

If you figure metropolitan areas...

Means large numbers per metro area.

My area Tampa Bay has got to be min. 25,000...

And that would be conservative...

Rakos
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,254 Posts
How is selecting "drop off areas" a way of selecting where you work? Wouldn't selecting "pickup areas" make more sense?
No. You can have a pickup at ORD that will take you anywhere from River Rd to Gary, Rockford or even Milwaukee. This feature is designed to filter out destinations you do not want to drive to.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,727 Posts
How is selecting "drop off areas" a way of selecting where you work? Wouldn't selecting "pickup areas" make more sense?
I agree. I would much rather be able to define a pickup area. I'm sick of getting $3 ride requests across a bridge or 15+ minutes away. The dropoff area isn't near as important for me.

And how do you know this for sure? Do you know the algorithm?
There is funny business going on for sure with the algorithm. It isn't simply the closest driver. Sometimes I feel like Uber is reserving the $3 fares for me when I go over my weekly average. There are countless posts from drivers detailing funny business where they get sent many miles to get a request when there are 8+ closer drivers within a few blocks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,254 Posts
I agree. I would much rather be able to define a pickup area. I'm sick of getting $3 ride requests across a bridge or 15+ minutes away. The dropoff area isn't near as important for me.

There is funny business going on for sure with the algorithm. It isn't simply the closest driver. Sometimes I feel like Uber is reserving the $3 fares for me when I go over my weekly average. There are countless posts from drivers detailing funny business where they get sent many miles to get a request when there are 8+ closer drivers within a few blocks.
How would specifying a pick up area eliminate those $3 rides?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,727 Posts
How would specifying a pick up area eliminate those $3 rides?
Because the $3 rides tend to be in a certain area at a certain time of day here. I don't want to get requests 15 minutes away which usually are $3-$5 rides which are harder to locate (awful apartment complexes with no easily visible building numbers and pax who do not text where they are properly) and tend to have passengers who report and low rate for every little thing including not going 7+ mph over the speed limit to make up for them requesting the ride too late so they get to work on time.

There is just a certain area (which is over a 20 mile stretch actually) which I prefer to work at a certain time. The fares tend to be better and with far less hassle.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,963 Posts
So Uber used to advertise that they operate everywhere and don't discriminate..

Now they put in a feature that allows drivers to avoid working everywhere and essentially discriminate. Hm.
They can't force drivers to work anywhere.Yes they never let you know where the riders going.
But they can't stop drivers from not picking up in a certain area unless they want to change the classification to employees.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,168 Posts
So legally they can't affect p/u point...

Butt...they CAN affect drop off point....hm

Sounds like the prelude ...

To another good Uber screwing...8)

Rakos
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,686 Posts

https://qz.com/1055050/uber-is-test...er-that-lets-drivers-choose-where-they-drive/

Uber is experimenting with giving a key decision-making power to drivers, making good on its "be your own boss" tagline.

The ride-hailing company is testing a "drop-off area filter" that lets drivers choose where they go. "We will only send you trips that have a drop-off location within the areas you have selected," reads a message introducing the feature, which was shared by drivers in multiple online forums. "The more areas you select, the more trips you'll likely get. And you can update your preference at any time."

Uber confirmed to Quartz that it is conducting a "small" test of the drop-off area filter. A spokesman declined to specify where the feature is being tested but said the drop-off zones drivers can opt into are large swaths of a city rather than individual neighborhoods. Drivers on Reddit reported spotting the feature in Boston and Toronto. "We are committed to our mission of reliable transportation, everywhere for everyone," the spokesman said in an emailed statement.

More than 2 million people drive for Uber worldwide and more than 600,000 in the US. The company hires these drivers as independent contractors and advertises the flexibility that they get by working on the Uber platform. But while drivers have long had control over their hours-they can sign on and off Uber freely-they've historically had little to no control over where Uber's routing algorithms take them.

Uber doesn't tell drivers where the drop-off is before they accept an incoming ride request. The company has said it does this to prevent drivers from discriminating against passengers heading to poorer and less accessible neighborhoods, which have historically been underserved by the taxi industry. The system can frustrate drivers, especially when a ride takes them far from other prospective customers.

Giving drivers more control over their destinations could go a long way toward addressing this pain point. Quartz reported Aug. 15 that Uber is also testing a "long trip" feature that warns drivers when a ride is likely to last over an hour.

Uber has committed to improving its frayed relations with drivers. In late June, the company debuted a sweeping campaign to improve the driver experience, titled "180 Days of Change." As part of that Uber added a tipping option to its rides and food-delivery apps and tweaked its ratings system so that riders are asked to justify when they leave a driver less than five stars.
About the long trip feature, I think it would be great if I can accept ONLY long trips. Similar to how a truck driver opts in for cross country routes rather than local.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,708 Posts
They can't force drivers to work anywhere.Yes they never let you know where the riders going.
But they can't stop drivers from not picking up in a certain area unless they want change the classification to employees.
So what you're saying is it'll be easier to get a ride out of a good neighborhood to a bad neighborhood than for the customer to get a ride from a bad neighborhood to a good neighborhood?

Bruh this all seriously sounds like redlining
 
1 - 20 of 120 Posts
Top