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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
At 5.01 pm on Tuesday 17 July 2018, Uber sent drivers the following important email about an update to its cancellation policy that will take effect from Tuesday 31 July 2018:

Cancellation policy update​

Making cancellations fairer

We've heard feedback that high driver-partner trip cancellation rates are occurring. This undermines the experience of riders and also negatively affects driver-partners who missed out on the chance to accept that ride request.

We understand that there may be times when something comes up that causes a driver to cancel an accepted trip.

Minimising driver cancellations helps ensure a high quality and reliable service for riders and driver-partners. Because of this we will update our policy for high driver-partner cancellation rates starting from 31 July 2018.

Under the updated policy, driver-partners with a high cancellation rate may be sent notifications for any of the following three reasons:

  1. Their cancellation rate is in the top 2% of driver-partners in their city over the last 7 days; or
  2. The number of times they've contacted riders immediately prior to a cancellation is in the top 2% of driver-partners in their city over the last 7 days; or
  3. Their cancellation rate in airport queues is in the top 2% of driver-partners in all airport queues in their city over the last 7 days.
As is the case with the current process, after driver-partners receive a first notification, if they receive a second notification within 6 weeks (based on one of the reasons above), their account may be temporarily suspended.

If they then receive a third notification within 6 weeks from the original notification, they may permanently lose access to the Uber Driver App.

To learn more about cancellation rates and our community guidelines head to the link below.

VIEW COMMUNITY GUIDELINES ❯

[end of email]

Jack Malarkey comments:

The deactivation policy within the community guidelines linked to in the email above has not yet been updated. That document was last updated on 22 November 2017.

Presumably, the community guidelines themselves will be relevantly updated from Tuesday 31 July (two weeks from the date on which the email was sent).

Basing warnings, suspensions and permanent deactivations on being in the top 2% of cancellations in specified circumstances may be problematic.

As general cancellations behaviour changes in response to the policy, it will become all the more difficult to escape the adverse consequences that might well eventually apply to objectively low cancellation rates.

This is a 'rank and yank' policy, which is unfortunate. See https://www.business.com/articles/the-end-of-rank-and-yank-management-practices-revisited/.

Enron is an example of a company that used 'rank and yank' on an unfortunate scale.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Is that mean, if cancellation rate reach 2% drivers account will be deactivated?
Touhid hasan, no it's based on the driver's cancellation rate being in the top 2% of drivers in their city (Canberra for us) for the previous seven days.

Here's the relevant part of the email:

  1. Their cancellation rate is in the top 2% of driver-partners in their city over the last 7 days; or
  2. The number of times they've contacted riders immediately prior to a cancellation is in the top 2% of driver-partners in their city over the last 7 days; or
  3. Their cancellation rate in airport queues is in the top 2% of driver-partners in all airport queues in their city over the last 7 days.
[end of extract]

I understand that Canberra currently has about 2,000 Uber drivers. This means that a driver could be in difficulty if they are in about the top 40 in terms of relevant cancellation rates.
 

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Touhid hasan, no it's based on the driver's cancellation rate being in the top 2% of drivers in their city (Canberra for us) for the previous seven days.

Here's the relevant part of the email:

  1. Their cancellation rate is in the top 2% of driver-partners in their city over the last 7 days; or
  2. The number of times they've contacted riders immediately prior to a cancellation is in the top 2% of driver-partners in their city over the last 7 days; or
  3. Their cancellation rate in airport queues is in the top 2% of driver-partners in all airport queues in their city over the last 7 days.
[end of extract]

I understand that Canberra currently has about 2,000 Uber drivers. This means that a driver could be in difficulty if they are in about the top 40 in terms of relevant cancellation rates.
The 7 days is silly. If you accept one trip then your car has an issue and you cancel and it goes in the shop your cancellation rate will be 100%. There has to be some common sense applied, which I know uber doesn't have.
 

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But we are not employees..... This all seems in contradiction to popular trends, particularly with high-tech companies that promote work/life balance.

Diane Stafford, writing in the Kansas City Star, points out that rating systems-if you'd rather call it that than "rank and yank"-purge dead wood to make room for more innovative workers and motivates everyone to do better. That's not necessarily a bad thing. Perhaps it is not the rating that's a problem, but who does it. Managers sometimes misuse any ranking system for any of a number of reasons:

  • To make themselves look good (by trying to get the largest percentage of high-rankings, regardless of actual merit)
  • To get rid of someone perceived to be a threat to their position
  • To punish insubordination
  • To keep a star performer from job hopping by giving a good, but not top evaluation
At the very least, if you're going to put in your mission statement that your company values work/life balance, don't be a hypocrite if what you really value are those who bring their laptops on their vacations.
Lyft will follow right behind them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
These new cancellation consequences effective from Tuesday 31 July mean that it’s important that drivers positively seek to ensure that it’s the rider who cancels and not them.

Any cancellation by a rider won’t ever count towards your cancellation tally but each and every cancellation by you will.

So if, for example, the rider has placed the pin a long way from their correct location or if they have a child aged under 7 without the correct booster seat or capsule, ask them to cancel the trip request.

It should be only if you can’t get them to cancel that you should cancel their trip request for them on your phone. If they have no idea how to cancel and can’t understand your clear explanation how to do so, offer to cancel for them on THEIR phone (not yours).

Of course, there will be some riders who refuse to cancel and you’ll need to cancel the trip on your phone. You should try to keep these and other cancellations on your phone to an absolute minimum.

Uber’s ‘rank and yank’ approach will undoubtedly quickly end the practice of some drivers cancelling accepted rides in favour of later requests via rideshare companies such as Ola with lower commissions or in favour of Uber surge trips (or trips with a higher surge).

It will also quickly end the practice of some drivers phoning riders and cancelling if the trip is short.

But as time goes on, it will become easier and easier potentially to fall victim to the ‘rank and yank’ policy.

That’s why it’s so important to avoid cancellations in the absence of a compelling reason.
 

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So drivers should be compensated when a rider cancels in the last minute after driver has travelled 4-5 miles on the highway..

And the riders should as well be suspended or deactivated if their cancellation rate falls below
 

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That's why it's so important to avoid cancellations in the absence of a compelling reason.
Also - if you see your cancellation rate climbing then by adhering to Uber's subliminal mind games you then go and do a whole lot of non-profitable, piddly little jobs you wouldn't normally do.

Viola ! Your cancellation rate has dropped, Uber has made more commission from the non-profitable, piddly little jobs you did. There's also a lot of happy pax. As per usual the driver gets the short straw.

And the riders should as well be suspended or deactivated if their cancellation rate falls below
To the best of my knowledge there ARE NO LIMITS to the number of times a PAX can cancel. As usual.....There's also a lot of happy pax and the driver gets the short straw.
 

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Yes, they always care about themself and customers, drivers are just money makers for them, as a contractor you have the right to cancel and accept a job, but Uber is full of bs, I wish people start using other rideshares, and totally neglect the f Uber,

You need to cancel when you are in the middle of highway, and it’s long way to turn back for picking passenger, because you get a really odd ping which can be 5-6 kms turning back, you are in a busy area and the passenger standing on the other side, it’s not safe to pick up sometimes, passenger is in wrong address, doesn’t show up but well the Fuber are just after sucking money and neglecting drivers who work hard and in the end it’s just Uber making the profit, and plus the passengers who have a great attitude towards and just leave negative ratings and comments, we have to pay our own rego, insurance, fuel, fines, time, quarterly GST..well if they hire us as an employee Andy paid us proper like an hourly rate, they do have the f side to cancel or suspend, whey the heck they want to act as a smart ass and bossy,
F..uber
 

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These new cancellation consequences effective from Tuesday 31 July mean that it's important that drivers positively seek to ensure that it's the rider who cancels and not them.

Any cancellation by a rider won't ever count towards your cancellation tally but each and every cancellation by you will.

So if, for example, the rider has placed the pin a long way from their correct location or if they have a child aged under 7 without the correct booster seat or capsule, ask them to cancel the trip request.

It should be only if you can't get them to cancel that you should cancel their trip request for them on your phone. If they have no idea how to cancel and can't understand your clear explanation how to do so, offer to cancel for them on THEIR phone (not yours).

Of course, there will be some riders who refuse to cancel and you'll need to cancel the trip on your phone. You should try to keep these and other cancellations on your phone to an absolute minimum.

Uber's 'rank and yank' approach will undoubtedly quickly end the practice of some drivers cancelling accepted rides in favour of later requests via rideshare companies such as Ola with lower commissions or in favour of Uber surge trips (or trips with a higher surge).

It will also quickly end the practice of some drivers phoning riders and cancelling if the trip is short.

But as time goes on, it will become easier and easier potentially to fall victim to the 'rank and yank' policy.

That's why it's so important to avoid cancellations in the absence of a compelling reason.
Aside from calling to avoid a short trip and rider no show, under what circumstances would a driver normally cancel?
I'm thinking a break down, intoxicated passenger or otherwise, however this would not be a common occurrence.
Just asking to figure out why this would impact drivers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Aside from calling to avoid a short trip and rider no show, under what circumstances would a driver normally cancel?
I'm thinking a break down, intoxicated passenger or otherwise, however this would not be a common occurrence.
Just asking to figure out why this would impact drivers.
Other reasons would include a rider waiting where it's illegal to stop; a rider having with them a child under 7 but no child seat or capsule; traffic conditions or road layout making it impractical to reach the rider within a reasonable time; and (for some drivers) the rider being an unaccompanied minor.

Note that the potential warnings and sanctions apply if your cancellations place you in the top 2% of DRIVERS in terms of cancellations. It is NOT based on your actual cancellation rate such as 2%. All cancellations by the driver for whatever reason count.

As some drivers are deactivated temporarily or permanently and other drivers become much more cautious about cancelling, the dark shadow will ratchet down closer and closer even to drivers who cancel only rarely and for good reason.

All it potentially takes is several no-shows in a week where you do relatively few trips and for this to result in a notification (warning) and another notification within six weeks of the first notification for temporary deactivation potentially to result; and then a third notification within six weeks of the FIRST notification for potential permanent deactivation to result.
 

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The less savoury reasons for Uber are drivers ringing the pax, asking their destination, and cancelling if they do don't like where they are going. That has been going on for a while, and perhaps is getting to be more of a problem.

However, it is no coincidence that this happens when Ola start operationing in Canberra. If an Uber driver has an Uber job, and is then offered an Ola job, especially is they are on the Ola intro 7.5% commission, then it is worth their while to cancel the Uber job and take the Ola job. Rather than Uber thinking that they might reduce the ridiculous 25% commission to something more reasonable, they threaten their 'partners'...
 

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I have had to cancel twice this week, Job request comes through just as you touch the phone to complete the trip

Both were 15 minutes away cancelled straight away.
 

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i think uber should be focusing n their drivers eg a better commision if you do our math on your trips of ur costs there are many trips that r not worth taking. I mean after the cost of driving there then the fare and the cost of driving to the destination minus gst minus uber greedy cut. cancellation is in our best interest. sad thing is most drivers don't calculate their costs.
 
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