Uber Drivers Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,050 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.npr.org/2016/05/17/478266839/this-is-your-brain-on-uber

This is actually a podcast by NPR Hidden Brain. The link is a summary of the podcast. Well worth listening to. The guest is the Head of Economic Research for Uber. He makes interesting points on the surge algorithm. But I had to laugh out loud when he started in about Uber Pool. It's a good listen. You can get it on iTunes or listen from the link I provided. If you use iPhone you can get the podcast here.
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/hidden-brain/id1028908750?mt=2&i=368846125

Here is the summary:

Uber is built on the scourge of surge. When demand is high, the company charges two, three, even NINE-POINT-NINE times as much as normal for a ride. Riders hate it . . . but not so much that they stop riding. Yep, "dynamic pricing" has helped the company to grow into one of the largest taxi services in the world. What's the psychology behind it? Shankar sits down with Uber's Head of Economic Research Keith Chen to talk about when we're most likely pay for surge, when we hate it the most, and why monkeys would probably act and feel the same way. That's right. Monkeys.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,813 Posts
http://www.npr.org/2016/05/17/478266839/this-is-your-brain-on-uber

This is actually a podcast by NPR Hidden Brain. The link is a summary of the podcast. Well worth listening to. The guest is the Head of Economic Research for Uber. He makes interesting points on the surge algorithm. But I had to laugh out loud when he started in about Uber Pool. It's a good listen. You can get it on iTunes or listen from the link I provided. If you use iPhone you can get the podcast here.
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/hidden-brain/id1028908750?mt=2&i=368846125

Here is the summary:

Uber is built on the scourge of surge. When demand is high, the company charges two, three, even NINE-POINT-NINE times as much as normal for a ride. Riders hate it . . . but not so much that they stop riding. Yep, "dynamic pricing" has helped the company to grow into one of the largest taxi services in the world. What's the psychology behind it? Shankar sits down with Uber's Head of Economic Research Keith Chen to talk about when we're most likely pay for surge, when we hate it the most, and why monkeys would probably act and feel the same way. That's right. Monkeys.
Chen really thinks the drunk pax rationalize a 2.1 surge to mean there's a good reason for surge. What an idiot. I've been at a strip club waiting for my clients and I overhear pax complaining about a 1.4 surge. Chen's logic applies to sober people, not to the 90% of Uber pax that are drunk during surge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,050 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Chen really thinks the drunk pax rationalize a 2.1 surge to mean there's a good reason for surge. What an idiot. I've been at a strip club waiting for my clients and I overhear pax complaining about a 1.4 surge. Chen's logic applies to sober people, not to the 90% of Uber pax that are drunk during surge.
My undergrad degree was in business statistics. One thing I remember from my college years and several stat classes is that consumers believe odd number stats over even number stats except with the number 5. So if I were to say 73% of Americans eat cheese, most people would believe that number over 75%, 80%, or even 82%. Not sure what's up with human psyche that doesn't like round numbers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,050 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Chen really thinks the drunk pax rationalize a 2.1 surge to mean there's a good reason for surge. What an idiot. I've been at a strip club waiting for my clients and I overhear pax complaining about a 1.4 surge. Chen's logic applies to sober people, not to the 90% of Uber pax that are drunk during surge.
What i find amusing is the drunk pax who thinks they are cheating the system or getting a deal when surge is at 3 on X but only 1.8 on select. 1.8 select is still more than 3x surge.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,813 Posts
My undergrad degree was in business statistics. One thing I remember from my college years and several stat classes is that consumers believe odd number stats over even number stats except with the number 5. So if I were to say 73% of Americans eat cheese, most people would believe that number over 75%, 80%, or even 82%. Not sure what's up with human psyche that doesn't like round numbers.
Yes, but we're talking about people so drunk they have a hard time figuring out the total cost from ordering off of the $.99 menu
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,050 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes, but we're talking about people so drunk they have a hard time figuring out the total cost from ordering off of the $.99 menu
Give the poor drunks a break, they have to figure out what 7% of $.99 is. When I partied like a rockstar at least I could figure out 20% of my bill then I threw in a few extra. Too many years in service industry not to tip at least 20%. I often tip my U/L drivers 100% or more. Especially on a min fare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,186 Posts
http://www.npr.org/2016/05/17/478266839/this-is-your-brain-on-uber

This is actually a podcast by NPR Hidden Brain. The link is a summary of the podcast. Well worth listening to. The guest is the Head of Economic Research for Uber. He makes interesting points on the surge algorithm. But I had to laugh out loud when he started in about Uber Pool. It's a good listen. You can get it on iTunes or listen from the link I provided. If you use iPhone you can get the podcast here.
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/hidden-brain/id1028908750?mt=2&i=368846125

Here is the summary:

Uber is built on the scourge of surge. When demand is high, the company charges two, three, even NINE-POINT-NINE times as much as normal for a ride. Riders hate it . . . but not so much that they stop riding. Yep, "dynamic pricing" has helped the company to grow into one of the largest taxi services in the world. What's the psychology behind it? Shankar sits down with Uber's Head of Economic Research Keith Chen to talk about when we're most likely pay for surge, when we hate it the most, and why monkeys would probably act and feel the same way. That's right. Monkeys.
This was a great listen! I loved hearing about the findings of the monkey experiences and that part made it worth sitting through the pool propaganda. It was also so interesting to hear stats about the psychology of surge since most of that data is held close to the chest by Uber.

I would still like to see them try a few weeks of double regular fare to see how it would effect ridership.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,050 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This was a great listen! I loved hearing about the findings of the monkey experiences and that part made it worth sitting through the pool propaganda. It was also so interesting to hear stats about the psychology of surge since most of that data is held close to the chest by Uber.

I would still like to see them try a few weeks of double regular fare to see how it would effect ridership.
Considering i do have a degree in statistics, I knew a bit about the psychology of round numbers. It was interesting to hear it in real life scenario. I loved the monkey bit too!
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top