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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
AT&T had everything in the old days, but was broken up to allow for fair competition.
What followed was very good for most consumers:

Benefits of the Breakup
The breakup of AT&T produced many immediate benefits for consumers. For many decades, AT&T did not allow users of their service to connect phones manufactured by other firms. They claimed these phones could degrade the quality of the network. AT&T also would not sell its own phones to consumers, so everyone had to rent phones from AT&T. The Baby Bells controlled the direct connections to consumers after the breakup, and they dropped these restrictions. There was soon a thriving market for selling phones to consumers. Phone prices dropped, quality increased, and renting phones faded away.

Now, we just need to have Uber broken up into regional players and let the taxicab companies have the same advantages as Uber and Lyft, so that they can play on the same level playing field.
 

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The app technology is widely available. A user base of both drivers and riders is the key component that Uber/Lyft rivals lack. Regionalization and specialized/niche markets may indeed be the winning strategy to change that.
 

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I've always believed that one of Uber's greatest fears has always been for drivers market their services directly to the public while cuttingout the glutinous, parasitical "middleman" Uber out of the equation.

The drivers wouldn't have to "own" the rideshare company or the app. Some sort of open source app could be created in which drivers post their rates and the pax could choose their drivers.

Any attempt by the drivers to cut Uber out would be met with absolutely ferocious lobbying by Uber and the other gig companies against it.

They would attempt to scare the living shit out of the pols and the public.
 

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Now, we just to have Uber broken up into regional players and let the taxicab companies have the same advantages as Uber and Lyft, so that they can play on the same level playing field.
[/QUOTE]
I don't want any govt-protected monopoly or cartel, whether it's the rideshare companies, the taxi industry, or any other entity or entities.
 

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I've always believed that one of Uber's greatest fears has always been for drivers market their services directly to the public while cuttingout the glutinous, parasitical "middleman" Uber out of the equation.

The drivers wouldn't have to "own" the rideshare company or the app. Some sort of open source app could be created in which drivers post their rates and the pax could choose their drivers.

Any attempt by the drivers to cut Uber out would be met with absolutely ferocious lobbying by Uber and the other gig companies against it.

They would attempt to scare the living shit out of the pols and the public.
There are open source rideshare apps. There are even free open source rideshare apps.

But without a driver/rider user base they do nothing.

There is nothing stopping anybody from utilizing such an app and following in the footsteps of Uber/Lyft. Both started out serving niche markets and utilized social media and word of mouth to get the word out about their services.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The real difference between a free ride share app and Uber or Lyft is consumer trust, privacy protections, and insurance.
But, all these cornerstone pillars have already been breached hundreds of times with incidents that exposed riders' private information, criminal acts and misbehavior by both drivers and riders, and often inadequate liability insurance.

Austin, Texas was a great example of what happens when the big ride share players decided to cease operations and 10,000 drivers lost their jobs overnight. Local ride share apps came to the rescue with some of them charging the drivers only 99 cents fee for each trip booked on the app.

There's no easy answer, but wanton disregard for the laws and steamrolling the competition should not be accepted or sanctioned by any state, or local municipalities for the sake of convenience or political favors.
 

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The real difference between a free ride share app and Uber or Lyft is consumer trust, privacy protections, and insurance.
But, all these cornerstone pillars have already been breached hundreds of times with incidents that exposed riders' private information, criminal acts and misbehavior by both drivers and riders, and often inadequate liability insurance.

Austin, Texas was a great example of what happens when the big ride share players decided to cease operations and 10,000 drivers lost their jobs overnight. Local ride share apps came to the rescue with some of them charging the drivers only 99 cents fee for each trip booked on the app.

There's no easy answer, but wanton disregard for the laws and steamrolling the competition should not be accepted or sanctioned by any state, or local municipalities for the sake of convenience or political favors.
It took Travis Kalanick to do it. The borrowed tricks of the trade from the intelligence community that Travis' crew used to conceal and confuse local authorities as to the true nature of Uber's operations in their communities is mind boggling. This was some serious high-tech supervillain stuff. We live in an era of high-tech supervillains.
 

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There are open source rideshare apps. There are even free open source rideshare apps.

But without a driver/rider user base they do nothing.

There is nothing stopping anybody from utilizing such an app and following in the footsteps of Uber/Lyft. Both started out serving niche markets and utilized social media and word of mouth to get the word out about their services.
The $6000 application fee to start a TNC in my state is pretty high though, and non-refundable. I'd be afraid of putting down $6000 only to be denied arbitrarily.

It is pretty well known that people who apply to start a taxi company are always denied.
 

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Now, we just to have Uber broken up into regional players and let the taxicab companies have the same advantages as Uber and Lyft, so that they can play on the same level playing field.

The largest gripe that the cab and limousine business has with the TNCs is that they never have played nor do they have to play by the same rules as do the taxicabs and limousines. The function of the government in the marketplace should be to make sure that the marketplace is fair and that everyone plays by the same rules. In the Washington market, at least, the government clearly has dropped the proverbial ball. It was well paid to do so.

It took Travis Kalanick to do it. The borrowed tricks of the trade from the intelligence community that Travis' crew used to conceal and confuse local authorities as to the true nature of Uber's operations in their communities is mind boggling. This was some serious high-tech supervillain stuff. We live in an era of high-tech supervillains.
Once Uber got its foot in the proverbial door with Uber Black, it sleazed in X. It had to pay off a little more to the politicians that already were recipients of its money, but pay off it did.
 

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So here’s the problems… as in multiple problems with that idea.

in order for that to work…

1. All drivers would need commercial for hire insurance.

this isn’t going to happen.

2. the price needs to be competitive. Which is a maybe.. if everyone is shelling out for commercial insurance they won’t be working for peanuts. Like I said this is only a maybe.

3. the service has to be as convienent as Uber and Lyft or they won’t use it. With vastly fewer drivers this is highly unlikely.

4. It has to be as customer friendly as Uber/Lyft are or the customers won’t jump over. Which if won’t be, if it’s driver owned the company won’t let paxholes walk all over the drivers. While this sounds horrible it’s true.

so if you made a competing company it’s going to fail for a number of reasons some dumber than orherwZ
 

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Drivers could become "free agents" via the use of open source software that would enable drivers to post their rates and pax to choose their drivers.

The drivers would pay a nominal fee to cover the cost of background checks and administrative costs.

Drivers would be required to have commercial insurance, which in all likelihood would become less expensive as the risk pool of drivers gets larger.

While my proposals are certainly doable, they're highly unlikely to ever see the light of day due to historic lobbying against driver free agency by the gig companies as well as the taxi industry. Unprecedented scare tactics would be used to prevent it's implementation.

A much more realistic scenario is for the govt to step in and regulate the rideshare business.
 

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So here’s the problems… as in multiple problems with that idea.

in order for that to work…

1. All drivers would need commercial for hire insurance.

this isn’t going to happen.

2. the price needs to be competitive. Which is a maybe.. if everyone is shelling out for commercial insurance they won’t be working for peanuts. Like I said this is only a maybe.

3. the service has to be as convienent as Uber and Lyft or they won’t use it. With vastly fewer drivers this is highly unlikely.

4. It has to be as customer friendly as Uber/Lyft are or the customers won’t jump over. Which if won’t be, if it’s driver owned the company won’t let paxholes walk all over the drivers. While this sounds horrible it’s true.

so if you made a competing company it’s going to fail for a number of reasons some dumber than orherwZ
3 and 4 help, but really if the pay is higher for drivers they, full timers anyway, will buy their own insurance, and if the prices are lower than Uber, people will use the service.

The difference between the driver pay and the amount Uber made from my fares is way more than commercial insurance costs.

If the government will approve of a driver owned tnc it could work.
 

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There are open source rideshare apps. There are even free open source rideshare apps.

But without a driver/rider user base they do nothing.

There is nothing stopping anybody from utilizing such an app and following in the footsteps of Uber/Lyft. Both started out serving niche markets and utilized social media and word of mouth to get the word out about their services.
There's definitely something stopping it, which is the deep pockets of the gig companies and taxi/livery industry which would spend historic amounts of money and engage in historic scare tactics to prevent drivers from operating as "free agents" marketing themselves directly to the public with no middlemen or companies.
 

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I think what's stopping it is a business plan that makes sense to an outside 3rd party. Someone would have to implement it, maintain it, provide technical support, market it, support drivers, pax, and outside agencies, make sure drivers are properly registered, insured, and met all local requirements. No one is doing all that for free so your right back to a fee for a third party administrator with just a different version of Uber.
 

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All that has been said in this thread has been very interesting to me , the only problem is us , we are the x in the equation ( human beings ) , someone with good intent brings something to the market , then the others see what a good idea it was and then it usually ends up going to shit over the years and the vultures just keep taking a bite off it till it’s nothing but bones , been happening throughout time and history , and Uber my friends is no different .

We as human beings inherently are the x in the equation that can never be solved
 

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So here’s the problems… as in multiple problems with that idea.

in order for that to work…

1. All drivers would need commercial for hire insurance.

this isn’t going to happen.

2. the price needs to be competitive. Which is a maybe.. if everyone is shelling out for commercial insurance they won’t be working for peanuts. Like I said this is only a maybe.

3. the service has to be as convienent as Uber and Lyft or they won’t use it. With vastly fewer drivers this is highly unlikely.

4. It has to be as customer friendly as Uber/Lyft are or the customers won’t jump over. Which if won’t be, if it’s driver owned the company won’t let paxholes walk all over the drivers. While this sounds horrible it’s true.

so if you made a competing company it’s going to fail for a number of reasons some dumber than orherwZ
Yes, and it's important to remember that Uber purchased its market share with billions of dollars of investor money. Lyft had fewer billions of investor money to spend, and was correspondingly able to purchase a lower market share.

Both Uber and Lyft have raised their prices because they know that there are no more easy billions of investor money to be had. A new rideshare upstart could insert itself into the market as a lower-cost competitor to UberLyft, to disrupt the disruptors and take market share from them. All that would be required to make it work would be another batch of investors willing to invest billions of dollars.

So there will be no successful new entrants into the rideshare industry either until UberLyft fails or a very resource-rich company willing to spend billions comes along.

Any talk of groups of drivers getting together and taking on UberLyft is farcical.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
This reminds me of Craigslist, which had a noble purpose of connecting buyers and sellers for free and without any fees.
Of course, things have changed a little over the years and now they charge some nominal fees for selling your car and businesses have to pay to post their open positions, but overall the system works great.

Actually, it became so successful that many newspapers that used to charge huge fees for their classified ads started losing money and some even went out of business.

Just imagine, if we could have a similar setup for connecting riders and drivers, but using an app with nominal fees for admin and overhead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
In December 2006, at the UBS Global Media Conference in New York, Craigslist CEO Jim Buckmaster told Wall Street analysts that Craigslist had little interest in maximizing profit, and instead preferred to help users find cars, apartments, jobs and dates.[17][18]

Craigslist's main source of revenue is paid job ads in select American cities. The company does not formally disclose financial or ownership information. Analysts and commentators have reported varying figures for its annual revenue, ranging from $10 million in 2004, $20 million in 2005, and $25 million in 2006 to possibly $150 million in 2007.[19][20][21] Fortune has described their revenue model as "quasi-socialist", citing their focus on features for users regardless of profitability. Eric Baker of StubHub has described the site as a "potential gold mine of revenue, if only it would abandon its communist manifesto."[19]
 

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Once Uber got its foot in the proverbial door with Uber Black, it sleazed in X.
There is an Interview with Travis on YouTube in which Travis points out how Lyft violates the law with every single ride they give. This was slightly before X premiered. One bandit cab operator calling the other bandit cab operator a law breaker.
 

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This reminds me of Craigslist, which had a noble purpose of connecting buyers and sellers for free and without any fees.
Of course, things have changed a little over the years and now they charge some nominal fees for selling your car and businesses have to pay to post their open positions, but overall the system works great.

Actually, it became so successful that many newspapers that used to charge huge fees for their classified ads started losing money and some even went out of business.

Just imagine, if we could have a similar setup for connecting riders and drivers, but using an app with nominal fees for admin and overhead.
Posters here have already given you multiple reasons why this idea won’t fly. You can listen to their expertise or pursue a fantasy that will probably drain your wallet and your energy.
 
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