Uber Drivers Forum banner
1 - 20 of 111 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tired of getting ride requests and when you get there they have kids but no car seats. Then they get pissed because I won't give you and your baby a ride without a carseat...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
Uber should send out notices to the public. If they have credit cards on file they also have mailing addresses. Send out pax incentives, and make the public aware of their policies and/or local laws.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,985 Posts
I wait the 5 minutes, cancel, get the no-show fee and report them. I don’t argue with them and I don’t let them close enough to the car to do any damage. If they call or text asking me to cancel, I don’t respond.

It does suck and I’m sick of it, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,985 Posts
Carry a booster seat, takes care of all your questions
Infants must be in an infant carseat though
I couldn't disagree more with this comment. I think it's reckless advice.

Car seats and boosters need to be adjusted specifically for the height and weight of each child. Car seats are constantly being recalled for various issues and, if there is any issue with the car seat you provide or the adjustment, the driver has just assumed needless liability.

If these parents and caregivers don't care enough about the safety of their own child, they don't deserve a ride. Some of them may even be hoping for an accident to get that easy personal injury money from Uber/Lyft and you. Remember, lawyers are going to sue EVERYBODY, not just Uber or Lyft. Refuse the ride. While you're waiting 5 minutes for the cancel fee, report them to Uber or Lyft. Or just cancel and move on. Whatever you do, don't give that ride.

Unless you truly meant "buster seat" to take out of your car and bust these parents over the head and knock some sense into them. Then I agree.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,652 Posts
Minnesota's Child Passenger Restraint Law
Minnesota Statute 169.685, Subd. 5

  • Minnesota Law: A child who is both under age 8 and shorter than 4 feet 9 inches is required to be fastened in a child safety seat that meets federal safety standards. Under this law, a child cannot use a seat belt alone until they are age 8, or 4 feet 9 inches tall. It is recommended to keep a child in a booster based on their height rather than their age. (Check the instruction book or label of the child safety seat to be sure it is the right seat for your child's weight and height.)
  • Safety seats must be installed and used according to the manufacturer's instructions.
  • Child must be secured (buckled) in the safety seat.
  • Seat must be secured to the vehicle.
  • Infants (under 20 pounds and one year of age) must be in a rear-facing safety seat.
  • Law applies to all motor vehicles originally built with factory-installed seat belts.
  • Law applies to all seating positions - everybody, every seat, every time.
  • Driver is responsible.
  • Petty misdemeanor fine for violation is $50 (may be waived if violator shows proof of obtaining a safety seat within 14 days).
  • Applies to both residents and non-residents of Minnesota.
  • Suspected non-use is a valid basis to stop a motor vehicle.

Child Safety Seat Guidelines (brochure)

Source: Minnesota Department of Public Safety, Office of Traffic Safety

Best Practices

  • When a child reaches age 4, if they still fit properly in their child car seat, keep using it until your child reaches the seat's upper limit for height and weight.
  • If your child is eight years old but shorter than 4'9", continue to use the booster seat.
  • Children under the age of 13 should sit in the back seat of a vehicle.
  • Put any loose objects in the trunk or secure them. In a crash, loose items can strike with great force and cause serious injury.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,985 Posts
Here's the only relevant part...

Minnesota's Child Passenger Restraint Law
Minnesota Statute 169.685, Subd. 5

  • Minnesota Law:
  • Driver is responsible.
So, if you provide a car seat, are you also going to:
  • Bring a tape measure to determine the height of the child,
  • Bring a scale to determine the weight of the child (Is that weight with or without clothes?),
  • Determine the age of the child (birth certificate?),
  • Consult the car seat users manual each ride to determine the correct adjustment for the height and weight of the child,
  • And adjust the car seat correctly for each child passenger?
If not, have fun during cross examination. Let me be clear- it's your car and your rules. You have the freedom to be as reckless as you want to be for that $3.24. I just don't like seeing horrible advice being given here without challenging it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,652 Posts
Just reach out to uber support, some dumb people work there.Here is what they said, and yes I repeatedly mentioned "providing a ride for a parent with small child" dumbheads


Our Terms of Service require that riders be at least 18 years old to have an Uber account. Riders under 18 cannot request or receive a ride unless they are accompanied by someone 18 or older.
If you think this policy is being violated, you can decline the ride request. If you completed a trip with a rider that you believe to be under an appropriate age and you'd like us to investigate further, feel free to let us know so we look into it.
Thanks for reaching out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
763 Posts
Minnesota's Child Passenger Restraint Law
Minnesota Statute 169.685, Subd. 5

  • Minnesota Law: A child who is both under age 8 and shorter than 4 feet 9 inches is required to be fastened in a child safety seat that meets federal safety standards. Under this law, a child cannot use a seat belt alone until they are age 8, or 4 feet 9 inches tall. It is recommended to keep a child in a booster based on their height rather than their age. (Check the instruction book or label of the child safety seat to be sure it is the right seat for your child's weight and height.)
  • Safety seats must be installed and used according to the manufacturer's instructions.
  • Child must be secured (buckled) in the safety seat.
  • Seat must be secured to the vehicle.
  • Infants (under 20 pounds and one year of age) must be in a rear-facing safety seat.
  • Law applies to all motor vehicles originally built with factory-installed seat belts.
  • Law applies to all seating positions - everybody, every seat, every time.
  • Driver is responsible.
  • Petty misdemeanor fine for violation is $50 (may be waived if violator shows proof of obtaining a safety seat within 14 days).
  • Applies to both residents and non-residents of Minnesota.
  • Suspected non-use is a valid basis to stop a motor vehicle.

Child Safety Seat Guidelines (brochure)

Source: Minnesota Department of Public Safety, Office of Traffic Safety

Best Practices

  • When a child reaches age 4, if they still fit properly in their child car seat, keep using it until your child reaches the seat's upper limit for height and weight.
  • If your child is eight years old but shorter than 4'9", continue to use the booster seat.
  • Children under the age of 13 should sit in the back seat of a vehicle.
  • Put any loose objects in the trunk or secure them. In a crash, loose items can strike with great force and cause serious injury.
Here is the section of the law which excludes "for hire" vehicles:

Subd. 6.Exceptions.
(a) This section does not apply to:

(1) a person transporting a child in an emergency medical vehicle while in the performance of official duties and when the physical or medical needs of the child make the use of a child passenger restraint system unreasonable or when a child passenger restraint system is not available;

(2) a peace officer transporting a child while in the performance of official duties and when a child passenger restraint system is not available, provided that a seat belt must be substituted;

(3) a person while operating a motor vehicle for hire, including a taxi, airport limousine, and bus, but excluding a rented, leased, or borrowed motor vehicle; and

(4) a person while operating a school bus that has a gross vehicle weight rating of greater than 10,000 pounds.

Here is the definition of "for hire" from the statutes:

Subd. 14.For hire.
"For hire" means for remuneration or compensation of any kind promised, paid, or given to or received by a person for the transportation of persons or property on the highways,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,985 Posts
Here is the section of the law which excludes "for hire" vehicles:

Subd. 6.Exceptions.
(a) This section does not apply to:

(1) a person transporting a child in an emergency medical vehicle while in the performance of official duties and when the physical or medical needs of the child make the use of a child passenger restraint system unreasonable or when a child passenger restraint system is not available;

(2) a peace officer transporting a child while in the performance of official duties and when a child passenger restraint system is not available, provided that a seat belt must be substituted;

(3) a person while operating a motor vehicle for hire, including a taxi, airport limousine, and bus, but excluding a rented, leased, or borrowed motor vehicle; and

(4) a person while operating a school bus that has a gross vehicle weight rating of greater than 10,000 pounds.

Here is the definition of "for hire" from the statutes:

Subd. 14.For hire.
"For hire" means for remuneration or compensation of any kind promised, paid, or given to or received by a person for the transportation of persons or property on the highways,
I didn't read anywhere in the statute where a "for hire" driver is protected from a lawsuit involving the death or injury of an unsecured child. Did I miss that part?

"Car crashes are the leading cause of death for children older than 3 in the U.S. and cause another 179,000 child injuries each year. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, child safety seats cut death risk by 71 percent for infant passengers and 54 percent for toddlers between the ages of 1 and 4 - if they are used properly."
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,652 Posts
At the same time I wasn't able to find anything regarding this issue.
Like news articles or uber drivers being sued

I will continue to write to uber support and see maybe I'll sone response from them.

As I'm waiting for their response please
disregard my advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,985 Posts
At the same time I wasn't able to find anything regarding this issue.
Like news articles or uber drivers being sued

I will continue to write to uber support and see maybe I'll sone response from them.

As I'm waiting for their response please
disregard my advice.
Lyft is very clear on the issue. This is the canned response I get from Lyft whenever I report pax with no car seats...

"We're following up on the incident that you reported regarding your passenger who didn't bring a car seat for their child. I'm so sorry to hear about this, and I appreciate you bringing this to our attention.

This sort of behavior by a passenger is a violation of our community guidelines and something that we don't tolerate on the Lyft platform.

I want to reassure you that the concerns you brought to our attention have been investigated. I've followed up with this passenger to take the appropriate and necessary actions. In the meantime, please know that you won't be paired with this passenger again.

As a friendly reminder, Lyft recommends that passengers provide car seats for their children. For more info on this,
read Policies for Uses of Lyft at our Help Center."


The "Policies for Uses of Lyft" states:
Children are welcome to join you in a ride but aren't permitted to ride alone in a Lyft vehicle.

We're happy to give kids a ride as well as adults as long as your children have the proper car seats that fit legal requirements in your state and city. Plan on providing your own car seat for children that require one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
763 Posts
..........
As a friendly reminder, Lyft recommends that passengers provide car seats for their children. For more info on this,
read Policies for Uses of Lyft at our Help Center."


We're happy to give kids a ride as well as adults as long as your children have the proper car seats that fit legal requirements in your state and city. Plan on providing your own car seat for children that require one.
Regrettably the legal requirement in Minnesota is none required in a for hire vehicle.

I think you misunderstand me. I am not saying that children should not be in car seats. I am only pointing out what the law is.

You started out by claiming the seats were required by law. They are not. Then you say children should be in car seats. I agree and always have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,985 Posts
Regrettably the legal requirement in Minnesota is none required in a for hire vehicle.

I think you misunderstand me. I am not saying that children should not be in car seats. I am only pointing out what the law is.

You started out by claiming the seats were required by law. They are not. Then you say children should be in car seats. I agree and always have.
I don't think I ever said it was illegal. If I did, I apologize for being unclear and/or incorrect. I've been talking about liability from the outset of this thread. So I do think we're talking about different things. This is how I see it:

Uber and Lyft carry ~$1-1.5 million coverage limit per accident. Even if Uber/Lyft were to cover the accident with an improperly secured child (and Lyft's 'Policies for Uses of Lyft' could be designed to insulate them from liability, because both driver and passenger would have breached that policy), who do you think is getting sued if that $1-1.5 million threshold is exceeded? The Independent Contractor who is the owner operator of the vehicle is the next target for the pax's lawyers. Most of us are sole proprietors, so our personal assets and future earnings are available for collection.

For me, that's too much exposure for $3.24.
 
1 - 20 of 111 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top