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It's called a SAFE RIDER FEE.
It is $1 that is added to the pax's fare and is purportedly for the commercial insurance coverage afforded to each pax while on a ride. Since it is part of the total fare, and fares are paid to the driver, Uber deducts that $1 + their commission from the fare amount and sends you the net amount as your earnings.

Example:
$5 min fare incurred by pax
- $1 SRF = $4 fare basis
$4 x 20% = $1.60 Uber Fee
= $2.40 net earnings​

At the end of the year, your tax documents from Uber will show your total earnings, the total SRF fees you 'collected' and the total SRF fees you paid to Uber.
When you file your taxes, in addition to all other business expenses, make sure you deduct the total SRF fees from the total amount paid to you by Uber as this reduces your gross (taxable) earnings amount.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's called a SAFE RIDER FEE.
It is $1 that is added to the pax's fare and is purportedly for the commercial insurance coverage afforded to each pax while on a ride. Since it is part of the total fare, and fares are paid to the driver, Uber deducts that $1 + their commission from the fare amount and sends you the net amount as your earnings.

Example:
$5 min fare incurred by pax
- $1 SRF = $4 fare basis
$4 x 20% = $1.60 Uber Fee
= $2.40 net earnings​

At the end of the year, your tax documents from Uber will show your total earnings, the total SRF fees you 'collected' and the total SRF fees you paid to Uber.
When you file your taxes, in addition to all other business expenses, make sure you deduct the total SRF fees from the total amount paid to you by Uber as this reduces your gross (taxable) earnings amount.
Thanks
 

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It's called a SAFE RIDER FEE.
It is $1 that is added to the pax's fare and is purportedly for the commercial insurance coverage afforded to each pax while on a ride. Since it is part of the total fare, and fares are paid to the driver, Uber deducts that $1 + their commission from the fare amount and sends you the net amount as your earnings.

Example:
$5 min fare incurred by pax
- $1 SRF = $4 fare basis
$4 x 20% = $1.60 Uber Fee
= $2.40 net earnings​

At the end of the year, your tax documents from Uber will show your total earnings, the total SRF fees you 'collected' and the total SRF fees you paid to Uber.
When you file your taxes, in addition to all other business expenses, make sure you deduct the total SRF fees from the total amount paid to you by Uber as this reduces your gross (taxable) earnings amount.
Just did 2 days of driving and i noticed first day that SRF was $1.30 then next day it went down to $1.00. Any idea why?
 

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There is a $.25 upcharge in the SRF for each person involved in a fare split, no idea what could cause an odd $.30 charge. Better to check in your market, might be something specific that happened with the ride, unless every ride had the $1.30 rider fee.

Also, the SRF is added on to the fare after the fact then removed again, so odd numbers like $1.30 shouldn't actually effect your earnings in any way, unless for some reason less than $1.30 was added.
 

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I got an answer from Uber, thanks to Michael from Cleveland for giving me an email address.

Here's a summary from the email:

The 1.30 is breakdown into two:
$1.00 is for Safe Rides Fee
$0.30 is for Chicago Transportation Network Service & Accessibility Fee (tax & fee)


As part of the new City of Chicago rideshare ordinance, a $0.30 tax & fee will be added to each uberX ride. This will be reflected in your receipt.

The $0.20 per ride fee is for ground transit tax. The additional $0.10 per ride goes to the wheelchair accessibility fund - used to fund projects around the city that make it more wheelchair accessible (e.g. WAV taxi subsidies).


So in other words, Chicago will cost the driver an extra 30 cents per trip on both the driver and the rider.
 

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So in other words, Chicago will cost the driver an extra 30 cents per trip on both the driver and the rider.
That's the FARE breakdown - what your RIDER pays.
Now compare that to your EARNINGS for the trip and let us know what Uber takes out of YOUR pocket.
 
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