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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mohammad Naieem pleaded guilty in the Broadmeadows Magistrates' Court on Thursday 6 May 2021 to a single charge of fraudulently obtaining payments.

He was fined $5,000 and also ordered to pay $1,000 in costs.

The court heard Naieem commenced receiving weekly compensation payments after he injured his back while working as a machinist at a furniture manufacturer in September 2017.

An investigation later found Naieem had earned more than $30,000 as a ride-share driver and a security guard until the fraud was uncovered in September 2018.

Naieem repeatedly failed to disclose the work and received $48,664 in compensation during that time.

WorkSafe's Insurance Business Unit Executive Director Roger Arnold said that this type of dishonesty undermines the integrity of the scheme.

"Weekly payments are there to help those Victorian workers who genuinely need care and support to recover from an injury and get back to work", Mr Arnold said.

"This prosecution should serve as a warning that those tempted to cheat the system for their own benefit will be caught and face serious consequences."

Source: https://www.worksafe.vic.gov.au/news/2021-05/man-convicted-compensation-fraud
 

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Mohammad Naieem pleaded guilty in the Broadmeadows Magistrates' Court on Thursday 6 May 2021 to a single charge of fraudulently obtaining payments.

He was fined $5,000 and also ordered to pay $1,000 in costs.

The court heard Naieem commenced receiving weekly compensation payments after he injured his back while working as a machinist at a furniture manufacturer in September 2017.

An investigation later found Naieem had earned more than $30,000 as a ride-share driver and a security guard until the fraud was uncovered in September 2018.

Naieem repeatedly failed to disclose the work and received $48,664 in compensation during that time.

WorkSafe's Insurance Business Unit Executive Director Roger Arnold said that this type of dishonesty undermines the integrity of the scheme.

"Weekly payments are there to help those Victorian workers who genuinely need care and support to recover from an injury and get back to work", Mr Arnold said.

"This prosecution should serve as a warning that those tempted to cheat the system for their own benefit will be caught and face serious consequences."

Source: https://www.worksafe.vic.gov.au/news/2021-05/man-convicted-compensation-fraud
looks like he got to keep the majority of the 48k something and only loss out on 6k. The guy still 42k in front plus earnings from RS & security work.
just didn't declare his earnings so he could claim the full compo for the back injury.
 

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The tax bill will make him wish he had syphilis

Some compo type payments are taxed some aren't ...he could get a pretty large bill plus a paygi assessment for next year ( which he could vary) ..not uncommon
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
looks like he got to keep the majority of the 48k something and only loss out on 6k. The guy still 42k in front plus earnings from RS & security work.
just didn't declare his earnings so he could claim the full compo for the back injury.
That's not how it would work. The compensation received ($48,664) will need to be reassessed and reduced to factor in the $30,000 additional income earned as a ride-share driver & security guard. He will be liable to repay that PLUS the $6,000 in fines & costs.

In a worst case scenario (for Mohammad) WorkSafe may argue that the claim in it's entirety was fraudulent - as he was fit enough to work over that 12 month period. If that's the case then he is up for:
  • $48,664 repayment of compensation
  • $5,000 fine
  • $1,000 costs
a total of $54,664
 

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That's not how it would work. The compensation received ($48,664) will need to be reassessed and reduced to factor in the $30,000 additional income earned as a ride-share driver & security guard. He will be liable to repay that PLUS the $6,000 in fines & costs.

In a worst case scenario (for Mohammad) WorkSafe may argue that the claim in it's entirety was fraudulent - as he was fit enough to work over that 12 month period. If that's the case then he is up for:
  • $48,664 repayment of compensation
  • $5,000 fine
  • $1,000 costs
a total of $54,664
driving and doing security work is very different to working as a machinist at a furniture manufacturer where you got to lift heavy things all day long "back breaking work most ants will pretty much die doing on their 1st day". It not a scam and anyone can wreck their backs doing that kind of work. The amount of removalist that got back problems hanging on to dear life and the amount of tow drivers that are pretty much crippled by their work too is all too common.

driving requires sitting and a lot of people with bad back take up a driving gig because they can't lift things anymore got a few on here with wrecked backs that just drives. security requires standing for long periods and a lot of people with bad bad can stand for long periods. The only jobs you can't do with a wrecked back comfortably is manual labour.

as much as you might like to think driving is manual labour it isn't. not saying scamming worker comp a good thing but tens of thousands of people do. that why for major claims they get private investigators out watching and following them about to catch them out of doing anything that isn't in the realm of possibility for their stated injuries. It pretty much fair to say doing some driving & security work wouldn't of breached his worker comp what he did wrong was that he didn't declare additional income.

The investigator only hired to get evidence of a breach to what his claiming not what his reporting that his earning. That information they have to find out through other means in which case they have and taken him to task over that. the world isn't black and white and perhaps Mr Mohammad Ali had four wives and a dozen children to feed and the 48k wasn't enough to cover living expenses that the worker comp was offering as well.

In my opinion it was a legitimate back injuries and worker comp wasn't enough $$$ the guy went out to make more and didn't declare it. Got a lot more dodgy people on worker comp faking neck, back and whatever disability and have to say I see a lot of true blue aussie doing that.
 

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That's not how it would work. The compensation received ($48,664) will need to be reassessed and reduced to factor in the $30,000 additional income earned as a ride-share driver & security guard. He will be liable to repay that PLUS the $6,000 in fines & costs.

In a worst case scenario (for Mohammad) WorkSafe may argue that the claim in it's entirety was fraudulent - as he was fit enough to work over that 12 month period. If that's the case then he is up for:
  • $48,664 repayment of compensation
  • $5,000 fine
  • $1,000 costs
a total of $54,664
He can pay $0 and flee the country
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
@Immoralized - Other than what's been reported, I don't know enough about the specifics of this case to speculate about what the financial consequences to Mr Naieem will (or won't) be. But I will make a few points:

1. There are always 2 types of legal actions & court systems. This case that's just been decided this month is a criminal case. The $5,000 fine is a punitive penalty and the $1,000 probably a statutory amount that won't come close to covering the prosecution's (and/or court's) entire legal cost.

WorkSafe still have the option to commence civil action. Usually a criminal prosecution happens first because a conviction in those courts improves the chances of a successful civil claim.

2. The type of work that Mr Naieem engaged in whilst in receipt of compensation isn't relevant. The problem is that he engaged in a fraud. The paperwork involved in any type of insurance-related claim typically runs into pages and I'm sure WorkSafe would include some clause somewhere that would invalidate the claim in it's entirety if it involves fraud. In a worst case scenario that would include a catch-all for all moneys already paid, plus interest & expenses etc.

Assuming it's a simple $ for $ offset for any additional income earned whilst on compensation and (if they're being lenient) that's all they're going to seek to recover, then he's still up for about $30,000 (plus the $6,000 fine to the court).

A fraud is a fraud.
 

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@Immoralized - Other than what's been reported, I don't know enough about the specifics of this case to speculate about what the financial consequences to Mr Naieem will (or won't) be. But I will make a few points:

1. There are always 2 types of legal actions & court systems. This case that's just been decided this month is a criminal case. The $5,000 fine is a punitive penalty and the $1,000 probably a statutory amount that won't come close to covering the prosecution's (and/or court's) entire legal cost.

WorkSafe still have the option to commence civil action. Usually a criminal prosecution happens first because a conviction in those courts improves the chances of a successful civil claim.

2. The type of work that Mr Naieem engaged in whilst in receipt of compensation isn't relevant. The problem is that he engaged in a fraud. The paperwork involved in any type of insurance-related claim typically runs into pages and I'm sure WorkSafe would include some clause somewhere that would invalidate the claim in it's entirety if it involves fraud. In a worst case scenario that would include a catch-all for all moneys already paid, plus interest & expenses etc.

Assuming it's a simple $ for $ offset for any additional income earned whilst on compensation and (if they're being lenient) that's all they're going to seek to recover, then he's still up for about $30,000 (plus the $6,000 fine to the court).

A fraud is a fraud.
without knowing of what going to happen in the future it is hard to speculate on what going to happen to him.
tens of thousands of people commit worker comp fraud and thousands get caught out every year it what happens unfortunately.

However he wasn't sitting on his a$$ just going off the benefits of what he was entitled to and going out earning an additional living which he probably should of made better judgement than pull the wool over their eyes and trying to get full payments for whatever reasons he needed it for.

Their are thousands out there with fake injuries just sitting on worker comp doing nothing and intention checking in on the cash because they have no intentions to work. Reason why private investigators are hired out quite frequently even to legitimate cases where the person has serious neck injury and leg injuries after a car accident that wasn't their fault. I've transported a few with busted up legs and necks going to the doctors for a check up and they have commented that an Private investigator follows them around and stakes outside of their houses quite often.

I can tell within a second the guy in actual pain and it actual injuries with blood shot eyes and the moans and groans as they get into the seat with viable stitches. Sometimes these insurance companies and organization go a bit too far with "investigating" on some people but not nearly enough on others.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I've done a First Aid course and I think we can both tell when someone is showing symptoms of pain. But neither of us are doctors qualified to make medical assessments (beyond the obvious).

I'm just pointing out the process of the law and possible civil consequences when there's a criminal conviction. As stated, I'm not aware of the specific circumstances of this case. Neither of us are privy to that information or qualified to speculate on that. It's pointless. The insurance company and/or civil courts will decide on that (assuming he hasn't already agreed on a plea bargain). Take note that he pleaded guilty. That's significant because a protracted/ contested case could have resulted in an even-worse outcome for him.
 

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I've done a First Aid course and I think we can both tell when someone is showing symptoms of pain. But neither of us are doctors qualified to make medical assessments (beyond the obvious).

I'm just pointing out the process of the law and possible civil consequences when there's a criminal conviction. As stated, I'm not aware of the specific circumstances of this case. Neither of us are privy to that information or qualified to speculate on that. It's pointless. The insurance company and/or civil courts will decide on that (assuming he hasn't already agreed on a plea bargain). Take note that he pleaded guilty. That's significant because a protracted/ contested case could have resulted in an even-worse outcome for him.
If you do the crime be prepare to do the time (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Easily avoided by hopping on the next Air India to Bombay.
It's been Mumbai since 1995, not Bombay. In any case fleeing overseas right now will be problematic for Mohammad, not just because of the extremely limited available flight bookings on AI. Having a criminal conviction means he will be flagged on departure as well as arrival in most countries. A visa may not be simple without engaging in further fraud.

I'm not saying it's not possible through indirect or unofficial channels, but he would also need to consider what he's giving up. It seems he's had residency with work rights since at least 2017 (and possibly more) and it's not clear if there's any family or assets here in Australia.
 

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Most likely on a PR if it was a student visa or a temporary one then he would of been deported after conviction.
People from overseas invest anywhere from 80k to 100k upwards for an aussie PR not including living expenses or time invested.
 
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Mohammad Naieem pleaded guilty in the Broadmeadows Magistrates' Court on Thursday 6 May 2021 to a single charge of fraudulently obtaining payments.

He was fined $5,000 and also ordered to pay $1,000 in costs.

The court heard Naieem commenced receiving weekly compensation payments after he injured his back while working as a machinist at a furniture manufacturer in September 2017.

An investigation later found Naieem had earned more than $30,000 as a ride-share driver and a security guard until the fraud was uncovered in September 2018.

Naieem repeatedly failed to disclose the work and received $48,664 in compensation during that time.

WorkSafe's Insurance Business Unit Executive Director Roger Arnold said that this type of dishonesty undermines the integrity of the scheme.

"Weekly payments are there to help those Victorian workers who genuinely need care and support to recover from an injury and get back to work", Mr Arnold said.

"This prosecution should serve as a warning that those tempted to cheat the system for their own benefit will be caught and face serious consequences."

Source: https://www.worksafe.vic.gov.au/news/2021-05/man-convicted-compensation-fraud
I’m so surprised our esteemed northern shit burb mosque attendees weren’t performing brain surgery or lecturing on astral physics at Monash???

Surely this must be a mistake - an individual from the outer northern suburbs with a Muslim name involved in a criminal activity??? Definitely a mistake -or maybe I’ve just got it the wrong way around….mmmmmm
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I’m so surprised our esteemed northern shit burb mosque attendees weren’t performing brain surgery or lecturing on astral physics at Monash???

Surely this must be a mistake - an individual from the outer northern suburbs with a Muslim name involved in a criminal activity??? Definitely a mistake -or maybe I’ve just got it the wrong way around….mmmmmm
Unless someone knows him personally, having a Muslim-sounding name doesn't mean much. He could have been born here.

@Immoralized is correct. If here on a temporary-type visa it's possible that he's facing deportation (or at least the threat if he re-offends).
 
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