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https://www.theverge.com/2018/5/22/17380374/self-driving-car-crash-consumer-trust-poll-aaa

Trust in self-driving cars is slipping after several high-profile crashes, two of them fatal, thrust driverless cars into a negative spotlight, a new poll finds. Nearly three-quarters (73 percent) of American drivers report they would be too afraid to ride in a fully self-driving vehicle. That number is up significantly from 63 percent in late 2017, according to a survey conducted by AAA. Additionally, almost two-thirds (63 percent) of US adults report they would feel less safe sharing the road with a self-driving vehicle while walking or riding a bicycle.

In March, a self-driving test vehicle owned by Uber hit and killed a 49-year-old woman in Tempe, Arizona. A few weeks later, a Tesla being driven with Autopilot crashed and caught fire on a California freeway, resulting in the driver's death. There were also severalother crashes involving self-driving cars resulting in minor injuries.

With these crashes as a backdrop, AAA contacted 1,014 adults on their phones (both landlines and cellphones) during the first week of April. They were asked three questions:

Are U.S. drivers comfortable with the idea of riding in a fully self-driving car? Are U.S. drivers comfortable with the idea of sharing the road with a self-driving car while walking or riding a bike? Do U.S. drivers want semi- autonomous technologies in their next vehicle?
Some of the key findings were as follows:

  • One in five (20 percent) US drivers would trust a self-driving vehicle, and 7 percent are unsure.
  • Women (83 percent) are more likely to be afraid than men (63 percent).
  • Two-thirds (64 percent) of millennial drivers would be too afraid to ride in a fully self-driving vehicle, up from 49 percent at the end of 2017. This represents the largest increase of any generation surveyed.
other recent polls that have shown an increasing skepticism toward self-driving cars. But it's easy to lose sight of a fundamental truth: most people still don't know what to think about this new technology because they have yet to experience it firsthand. There are a handful of tests being conducted on public roads in states like Arizona, California, Texas, Georgia, and Michigan. But there are no self-driving cars being sold at dealerships, nor are there any robot taxis providing trips at any meaningful scale.

"This technology is relatively new and everyone is watching it closely," said Greg Bannon, director of automotive engineering at AAA, in a statement. "When an incident occurs, it gets a lot of media attention, and people become concerned about their safety."

To be human is to fear the unknown. And since only a tiny fraction of people have ever had the experience of riding in a self-driving car, most still fear them: the loss of control, the distrust of the technology, the fear of malicious hacking, etc. The companies that hope to eventually make lots of money on autonomous vehicles realize their promised riches will never materialize if they can't convince ordinary people to go for a ride.

That's why Intel is producing commercials featuring LeBron James, and Waymo is going overboard with its own ad campaign touting the safety of its technology. Slick marketing will obviously play a role in generating excitement, but it will take more than a few ads to convince enough people to set aside their fears and climb inside a driverless vehicle. How the industry responds to crashes involving self-driving cars - and there will be more to come - will play a bigger role in setting the tone moving forward.
 

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People used to be afraid to get in a plane and to deposit cash into a machine.

Now they do both without thinking twice.

They says planes are safer than driving and I trust the ATM more than the teller.
Yes, but same fear factor that many have for planes, applies to SDC's. The loss of control and ability to 'stop and get out' if and when things go horribly wrong...
 

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https://www.theverge.com/2018/5/22/17380374/self-driving-car-crash-consumer-trust-poll-aaa

Trust in self-driving cars is slipping after several high-profile crashes, two of them fatal, thrust driverless cars into a negative spotlight, a new poll finds. Nearly three-quarters (73 percent) of American drivers report they would be too afraid to ride in a fully self-driving vehicle. That number is up significantly from 63 percent in late 2017, according to a survey conducted by AAA. Additionally, almost two-thirds (63 percent) of US adults report they would feel less safe sharing the road with a self-driving vehicle while walking or riding a bicycle.

In March, a self-driving test vehicle owned by Uber hit and killed a 49-year-old woman in Tempe, Arizona. A few weeks later, a Tesla being driven with Autopilot crashed and caught fire on a California freeway, resulting in the driver's death. There were also severalother crashes involving self-driving cars resulting in minor injuries.

With these crashes as a backdrop, AAA contacted 1,014 adults on their phones (both landlines and cellphones) during the first week of April. They were asked three questions:

Are U.S. drivers comfortable with the idea of riding in a fully self-driving car? Are U.S. drivers comfortable with the idea of sharing the road with a self-driving car while walking or riding a bike? Do U.S. drivers want semi- autonomous technologies in their next vehicle?
Some of the key findings were as follows:

  • One in five (20 percent) US drivers would trust a self-driving vehicle, and 7 percent are unsure.
  • Women (83 percent) are more likely to be afraid than men (63 percent).
  • Two-thirds (64 percent) of millennial drivers would be too afraid to ride in a fully self-driving vehicle, up from 49 percent at the end of 2017. This represents the largest increase of any generation surveyed.
other recent polls that have shown an increasing skepticism toward self-driving cars. But it's easy to lose sight of a fundamental truth: most people still don't know what to think about this new technology because they have yet to experience it firsthand. There are a handful of tests being conducted on public roads in states like Arizona, California, Texas, Georgia, and Michigan. But there are no self-driving cars being sold at dealerships, nor are there any robot taxis providing trips at any meaningful scale.

"This technology is relatively new and everyone is watching it closely," said Greg Bannon, director of automotive engineering at AAA, in a statement. "When an incident occurs, it gets a lot of media attention, and people become concerned about their safety."

To be human is to fear the unknown. And since only a tiny fraction of people have ever had the experience of riding in a self-driving car, most still fear them: the loss of control, the distrust of the technology, the fear of malicious hacking, etc. The companies that hope to eventually make lots of money on autonomous vehicles realize their promised riches will never materialize if they can't convince ordinary people to go for a ride.

That's why Intel is producing commercials featuring LeBron James, and Waymo is going overboard with its own ad campaign touting the safety of its technology. Slick marketing will obviously play a role in generating excitement, but it will take more than a few ads to convince enough people to set aside their fears and climb inside a driverless vehicle. How the industry responds to crashes involving self-driving cars - and there will be more to come - will play a bigger role in setting the tone moving forward.
Surveys are bs. They ask a hand full of people and throw results at your face. 1000 people have no say over ****ing 320 Million population.
 

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People used to be afraid to get in a plane and to deposit cash into a machine.

Now they do both without thinking twice.

They says planes are safer than driving and I trust the ATM more than the teller.
That won't last long. At one time most people were afraid to ride in an airplane.
Hey! Don't steal my material!
 

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But how many people would board a plane that didn't have a pilot in the cockpit?
Totally different.
The percentage of car accidents that result in fatalities or even serious injuries is very low.

I'd feel safer being inside the driverless car than on the crosswalk
 

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Surveys are bs. They ask a hand full of people and throw results at your face. 1000 people have no say over &%[email protected]!*ing 320 Million population.
If surveys are done in a scientific manner then they are very accurate.....perhaps you need to study up on some of the science behind it.
That being said you have to question the method.
Is AAA only asking AAA members?
If so then they are getting a skewed representation of the 320 million.

The results however echo my own survey when I have asked riders if they would take a driverless car.
The % who said now way is much higher than the AAA results.
Of course the ones you are taking to the airport then get in a mostly driverless airplane with a couple hundred other people and travel at 600 mph thought the air.

How long were airplanes flying around before the masses of the population began using them routinely?
It is going to take a long time before SDC's are the norm......doubtful if Uber and Lyft will be around by then.
 

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If surveys are done in a scientific manner then they are very accurate.....perhaps you need to study up on some of the science behind it.
That being said you have to question the method.
Is AAA only asking AAA members?
If so then they are getting a skewed representation of the 320 million.

The results however echo my own survey when I have asked riders if they would take a driverless car.
The % who said now way is much higher than the AAA results.
Of course the ones you are taking to the airport then get in a mostly driverless airplane with a couple hundred other people and travel at 600 mph thought the air.

How long were airplanes flying around before the masses of the population began using them routinely?
It is going to take a long time before SDC's are the norm......doubtful if Uber and Lyft will be around by then.
You cannot generalize shit by asking a handful of people dude. It's all theoretical nothing concrete.

Also people change their minds all the time unless the survey subject is dogmatic.
 

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People were afraid to sit in a stranger's car, now they call it ride share service.
I fly with airplane a lot, every time I am afraid, but still doing it.
I believe by the time driverless cars are used in LA, we already be retired or dead.
 

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Let's see...

Would you be afraid of the gun just sitting there pointing at someones head or the guy holding the gun pointing at someone's head?

Cars may be flawless but as long as humans are driving or anywhere near these cars, it will be humans fault for some kind of accident.
 

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100% of Americans are an afraid peoples.

People used to be afraid to get in a plane and to deposit cash into a machine.

Now they do both without thinking twice.

They says planes are safer than driving and I trust the ATM more than the teller.
I am still afraid of atm machines, mister. I MEAN.. WHERE THE HECK DOES THE MONEY GO?
 
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