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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1. I often come across riders who think we make the $4 minimum fare and have to explain to them that it is actually $2.40. When I first started driving, I thought the same: that I would be making $3.20 minimum. (Those 80 cents do add up over time!) HOW IS THIS SHIT LEGAL?! I thought RIDERS paid the $1 SRF?! Isn't this misleading for both riders and drivers? It is specified in clear numbers on the service fee schedule they give us when we join. MINIMUM FARE: $4. Says nothing about SRF being a part of that. Which is evidenced by the way they calculate longer trips -- SRF is ADDED to the actual fare. How is that not false advertising/reneging on a contract? Am I missing something? Please educate me. Any lawyers around?

2. Is there a precedent with other companies for something like the SRF? What are the rules governing the management of those fees that Uber collects? Do they actually use them for the purposes they say they do on their website (not that I agree that they should collect additional fees for those purposes)? And if they do, who is keeping them accountable for how that money is spent? Is it part of their income/do they pay taxes on it? Is there a special account that this money goes into? And if so, how often does Uber deposit the SRFs collected into that account, i.e. how long does the "processing time" take? And during any such "processing time," does Uber use that money for investments/stock trading (we all know money never rests or sleeps at night; as companies in the US close down overnight, their liquid assets are used for trading at overseas stock markets and they wake up to profits)? If so, does Uber collect the profits of any such trading or does it go into that hypothetical account?

I know you guys may not be able to answer some of these questions, but just thinking out loud/venting.
 

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Riders always pay the SRF. It shows on your pay statement as a credit and debit. You are never responsible for a penny of the SRF.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Riders always pay the SRF. It shows on your pay statement as a credit and debit. You are never responsible for a penny of the SRF.
I think you missed my point. If I am promised a minimum fare of $4, but the SRF comes out of that $4, how is that the rider paying the SRF? Yes, on longer rides, riders do pay the SRF because it is ADDED to the actual fare. But when it comes to the short $4 trips, the SRF is SUBTRACTED from the minimum fare. That inconsistency is what I am after.
 

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The $4 minimum fee rider side is $4 anywhere it is listed is from the riders side. I think it sucks too, lyft adds the srf after the min fare, Uber doesn't. Look at your pay statement it clearly states minimum fare $3 + $1 safe rider fee, they then take the srf then their %.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The $4 minimum fee rider side is $4 anywhere it is listed is from the riders side. I think it sucks too, lyft adds the srf after the min fare, Uber doesn't. Look at your pay statement it clearly states minimum fare $3 + $1 safe rider fee, they then take the srf then their %.
Good to know that about Lyft. Thanks for the info. If they are doing that, then we know at least they know something about Uber's system isn't right.
 

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Good to know that about Lyft. Thanks for the info. If they are doing that, then we know at least they know something about Uber's system isn't right.
It is something nice about lyft as is the tip feature. What sucks about lyft is absolutely no support, took 2 weeks to get paid for a puker and over a week before I initially heard back from them.
 

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I think you missed my point. If I am promised a minimum fare of $4, but the SRF comes out of that $4, how is that the rider paying the SRF? Yes, on longer rides, riders do pay the SRF because it is ADDED to the actual fare. But when it comes to the short $4 trips, the SRF is SUBTRACTED from the minimum fare. That inconsistency is what I am after.
There is no difference in how SRF is handled between a minimum fare vs. a long far. The SRF is worked the same way in both - you just aren't noticing as much on the non-minimum fare because it's a larger amount.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
There is no difference in how SRF is handled between a minimum fare vs. a long far. The SRF is worked the same way in both - you just aren't noticing as much on the non-minimum fare because it's a larger amount.
You know, I would humbly accept an accusation about not knowing how to do math since I am a social sciences major. But I invite you to do the calculations yourself. On longer fares, the customer is always charged $1.10/mile + $0.18/minute, which equals the fare + $1 (SRF). Uber automatically deducts the $1 and then subtracts its 20% fee out of the fare. But on minimum fares, when it should be $4 + $1 (SRF), the SRF is instead taken out of the minimum fare. I am saying that is wrong or else they need to redefine what "fare" means. Look at your weekly payment statements: fare and SRF are listed separately. Looking at your earnings for every trip, you are shown the fare after the SRF has been deducted. So when this same company tells me minimum "fare" is $4, I expected them to mean that before including SRF. Otherwise it is misleading to drivers and to riders alike. Even costly to drivers because we are losing 80 cents on every minimum fare trip, which make up a large (if not a majority) of my trips personally.

I wonder if Uber is doing this because of how confusing this simple issue appears to be to most drivers. If that's the case, it's embarrassing. Ask yourself: why is Lyft doing what limepro described above whereas Uber does it this way?
 

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With Uber, a "fare" is defined as the total cost of base fare + mileage + time + SRF. This can be seen by reviewing your trip history for both minimum and non-minimum fares. Note that the SRF is included in all of these records.

With Lyft, a "fare" is defined as the total cost of base fare + mileage + time. The Trust & Safety fee is never shown to the driver in any fare reporting and resides outside of any minimum fare calculations.

I'm not saying I agree with Uber here, I'm just saying your vision of minimum vs. non-minimum calculations does not match the Uber reality.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
With Uber, a "fare" is defined as the total cost of base fare + mileage + time + SRF. This can be seen by reviewing your trip history for both minimum and non-minimum fares. Note that the SRF is included in all of these records.
It isn't. But I give up looking for an answer here. I am now realizing why this issue hasn't become a subject of some sort of a suit or publicity. I'll take my questions elsewhere. :) Thanks for partaking, however!
 

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I've been doing Lyft a year past 6months full time and always get my 20%. When they send me those opt-in emails for guarantees I never opt in bc it will mess up my bonus. I will work Friday's peak hours and then Saturday 4pm-9pm peak hours. Bam got my peak hours done I'm at at least 50hrs and my acceptance rate is around 97% ish. I leave Sunday open if I couldn't finish my peak hours Friday or Saturday.
 

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You know, I would humbly accept an accusation about not knowing how to do math since I am a social sciences major. But I invite you to do the calculations yourself. On longer fares, the customer is always charged $1.10/mile + $0.18/minute, which equals the fare + $1 (SRF). Uber automatically deducts the $1 and then subtracts its 20% fee out of the fare. But on minimum fares, when it should be $4 + $1 (SRF), the SRF is instead taken out of the minimum fare. I am saying that is wrong or else they need to redefine what "fare" means. Look at your weekly payment statements: fare and SRF are listed separately. Looking at your earnings for every trip, you are shown the fare after the SRF has been deducted. So when this same company tells me minimum "fare" is $4, I expected them to mean that before including SRF. Otherwise it is misleading to drivers and to riders alike. Even costly to drivers because we are losing 80 cents on every minimum fare trip, which make up a large (if not a majority) of my trips personally.

I wonder if Uber is doing this because of how confusing this simple issue appears to be to most drivers. If that's the case, it's embarrassing. Ask yourself: why is Lyft doing what limepro described above whereas Uber does it this way?
Just drive Lyft it's the better of the two evils. I make around $100 extra a week in tips
 
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