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Right it is. I only do this part time (i wish i was flexible enough to kick myself on the head everytime i say that), just to pay off a loan, medical bills and an extremely late phone bill. Getting a raise from my real job in July, so it wont be so bad.

Though, thanks to lyft, my Adidas collection has grown. The longboard makes me happy as well.
 

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http://www.latimes.com/business/technology/la-fi-tn-uber-lyft-work-study-20180530-story.html

When ride-hailing services Uber and Lyft arrived in Los Angeles six years ago, they sold Angelenos on the narrative that driving for their companies was little more than a side-hustle - a flexible way to make money while being your own boss.

That narrative is no longer true in 2018, according to research released Wednesday from UCLA's Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, which found that more than half of Uber and Lyft drivers in Los Angeles drive full time. Many also struggle to pay for expenses such as gas, insurance and vehicle maintenance costs, and around a third either purchased or leased their car specifically to drive for the companies and must now continue driving to pay off those loans.
"We knew from seeing the news coverage that conditions for Uber and Lyft drivers were bad, but it was shocking to see how bad it was," said Lucero Herrera, a coauthor of the report.

Around half of Uber and Lyft drivers surveyed said it's their only job, and roughly the same percentage said they work more than 35 hours a week and struggle to pay for gas, insurance and car maintenance costs. Many said they drive extra hours, borrow money, or use a credit card to pay those expenses.

About two-thirds of respondents said driving for Uber or Lyft was their main source of income.

The majority of respondents said they wanted higher wages and payment transparency, the ability to choose their passengers without penalty, and assistance with vehicle care and maintenance. The drivers - who are classified as independent contractors rather than employees - overwhelmingly said they want to negotiate the conditions of their contract with Uber and Lyft.

Uber and Lyft, which were not consulted for the report, pushed back on the findings, noting that its 260 survey participants represent only a small fraction of the tens of thousands of ride-hailing drivers in Los Angeles County.

An Uber spokesperson also drew attention to the report's research advisors, one of which is a member of the National Taxi Workers Alliance - a group that has historically been critical of the ride-hailing industry.

Citing Lyft's own research, which was released this year, the company's Los Angeles general manager, Allen Narcisse, said that Lyft surveyed 37,000 of its own drivers across the country and found that the majority use it to supplement their income.

"In Los Angeles specifically, 93% drive fewer than 20 hours per week," Narcisse said.

Driver earnings and work conditions have long been a point of contention for ride-hailing companies, with a growing chorus of drivers expressing dissatisfaction with declining pay and a lack of control over their fares. Uber and Lyft have remained steadfast in their stance that they give drivers flexibility and neither have budged on the matter of fares, although both have recently made concessions to sweeten the deal for drivers, offering discounts on gas, maintenance and insurance, rewarding drivers with cash bonuses and embarking on listening tours to make drivers feel heard.

Still, some researchers worry that Uber's and Lyft's business models are leading to a decline in labor standards, while others posit that the gig economy is itself an alternative safety net that allows those who are otherwise out of a job to keep their heads above water.

Herrera said she hopes the report will at the very least raise awareness among drivers, regulators and members of the public so they can start talking about ways to protect drivers and improve working conditions.

"We want to lift the voice of the drivers and spur a conversation so we can work together to improve this industry," Herrera said.

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi says the company is on track for a 2019 IPO
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/05/30/uber-ceo-on-ipo-plans-and-warren-buffett.html

Uber is on track to go public in 2019, CEO Dara Khosrowshahi told CNBC.

"We're in a good position in terms of the company's profile, in terms of profitability and margins continue to get better," Khosrowshahi told CNBC's Carl Quintanilla at the Code Conference in Rancho Palos Verdes, California.

Khosrowshahi added that Uber has a "very strong balance sheet."

"I do think that we're on track in 2019 for an IPO," he said. "Lots of things can happen in the world but we have a reasonable buffer as well, so I think we're in a pretty good spot."

Uber is targeting to go public in late 2019 but the company has not started interviewing banks yet, according to a person familiar with the matter.

Last week, Uber said it had strong revenue growth and reduced lossesin the first quarter of this year. The company revealed that net revenue was up 67 percent on-year and losses narrowed 49 percent on-year. Those numbers exclude a $3 billion first quarter gain from the sale of Uber's Southeast Asian business to rival company Grab and a business merger in Russia with Yandex.Taxi.

The CEO said that he is looking to build out his management team, rebuild the brand and improve the product before the company goes public. That includes hiring a chief financial officer, he said.

Khosrowshahi also spoke about legendary investor Warren Buffett, who earlier told CNBC that he was an admirer of the Uber chief.
 

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http://www.latimes.com/business/technology/la-fi-tn-uber-lyft-work-study-20180530-story.html

When ride-hailing services Uber and Lyft arrived in Los Angeles six years ago, they sold Angelenos on the narrative that driving for their companies was little more than a side-hustle - a flexible way to make money while being your own boss.

That narrative is no longer true in 2018, according to research released Wednesday from UCLA's Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, which found that more than half of Uber and Lyft drivers in Los Angeles drive full time. Many also struggle to pay for expenses such as gas, insurance and vehicle maintenance costs, and around a third either purchased or leased their car specifically to drive for the companies and must now continue driving to pay off those loans.
"We knew from seeing the news coverage that conditions for Uber and Lyft drivers were bad, but it was shocking to see how bad it was," said Lucero Herrera, a coauthor of the report.

Around half of Uber and Lyft drivers surveyed said it's their only job, and roughly the same percentage said they work more than 35 hours a week and struggle to pay for gas, insurance and car maintenance costs. Many said they drive extra hours, borrow money, or use a credit card to pay those expenses.

About two-thirds of respondents said driving for Uber or Lyft was their main source of income.

The majority of respondents said they wanted higher wages and payment transparency, the ability to choose their passengers without penalty, and assistance with vehicle care and maintenance. The drivers - who are classified as independent contractors rather than employees - overwhelmingly said they want to negotiate the conditions of their contract with Uber and Lyft.

Uber and Lyft, which were not consulted for the report, pushed back on the findings, noting that its 260 survey participants represent only a small fraction of the tens of thousands of ride-hailing drivers in Los Angeles County.

An Uber spokesperson also drew attention to the report's research advisors, one of which is a member of the National Taxi Workers Alliance - a group that has historically been critical of the ride-hailing industry.

Citing Lyft's own research, which was released this year, the company's Los Angeles general manager, Allen Narcisse, said that Lyft surveyed 37,000 of its own drivers across the country and found that the majority use it to supplement their income.

"In Los Angeles specifically, 93% drive fewer than 20 hours per week," Narcisse said.

Driver earnings and work conditions have long been a point of contention for ride-hailing companies, with a growing chorus of drivers expressing dissatisfaction with declining pay and a lack of control over their fares. Uber and Lyft have remained steadfast in their stance that they give drivers flexibility and neither have budged on the matter of fares, although both have recently made concessions to sweeten the deal for drivers, offering discounts on gas, maintenance and insurance, rewarding drivers with cash bonuses and embarking on listening tours to make drivers feel heard.

Still, some researchers worry that Uber's and Lyft's business models are leading to a decline in labor standards, while others posit that the gig economy is itself an alternative safety net that allows those who are otherwise out of a job to keep their heads above water.

Herrera said she hopes the report will at the very least raise awareness among drivers, regulators and members of the public so they can start talking about ways to protect drivers and improve working conditions.

"We want to lift the voice of the drivers and spur a conversation so we can work together to improve this industry," Herrera said.

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi says the company is on track for a 2019 IPO
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/05/30/uber-ceo-on-ipo-plans-and-warren-buffett.html

Uber is on track to go public in 2019, CEO Dara Khosrowshahi told CNBC.

"We're in a good position in terms of the company's profile, in terms of profitability and margins continue to get better," Khosrowshahi told CNBC's Carl Quintanilla at the Code Conference in Rancho Palos Verdes, California.

Khosrowshahi added that Uber has a "very strong balance sheet."

"I do think that we're on track in 2019 for an IPO," he said. "Lots of things can happen in the world but we have a reasonable buffer as well, so I think we're in a pretty good spot."

Uber is targeting to go public in late 2019 but the company has not started interviewing banks yet, according to a person familiar with the matter.

Last week, Uber said it had strong revenue growth and reduced lossesin the first quarter of this year. The company revealed that net revenue was up 67 percent on-year and losses narrowed 49 percent on-year. Those numbers exclude a $3 billion first quarter gain from the sale of Uber's Southeast Asian business to rival company Grab and a business merger in Russia with Yandex.Taxi.

The CEO said that he is looking to build out his management team, rebuild the brand and improve the product before the company goes public. That includes hiring a chief financial officer, he said.

Khosrowshahi also spoke about legendary investor Warren Buffett, who earlier told CNBC that he was an admirer of the Uber chief.
We are making this company billions, and they're giving us peanuts.
 

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Do you guys really struggle to make ends meet? Seems to me that if you even have half an idea about what you're doing you can make $1,000 a week working 40 hours. Buy a 10 year old Prius and your costs are low. In fact, with the tax benefits of the mileage deduction, expenses pretty much cancel out.

Don't get me wrong, I've got a lot of complaints about Uber, but I'm definitely not about to starve or anything.
 

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Do you guys really struggle to make ends meet? Seems to me that if you even have half an idea about what you're doing you can make $1,000 a week working 40 hours. Buy a 10 year old Prius and your costs are low. In fact, with the tax benefits of the mileage deduction, expenses pretty much cancel out.

Don't get me wrong, I've got a lot of complaints about Uber, but I'm definitely not about to starve or anything.
Same here, but with that new surge process coming, you just might starve.

Read some of these threads about that new surge process, and it will blow your mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Do you guys really struggle to make ends meet? Seems to me that if you even have half an idea about what you're doing you can make $1,000 a week working 40 hours. Buy a 10 year old Prius and your costs are low. In fact, with the tax benefits of the mileage deduction, expenses pretty much cancel out.

Don't get me wrong, I've got a lot of complaints about Uber, but I'm definitely not about to starve or anything.
New member eh? Well it's so obvious your a shill for uber
 

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I checked your posts you are claiming you make 5k a week and it's possible to clear 1k on Uber x in 20 hours?
I didn't say I make 5k a week. :eek:

I checked your posts you are claiming you make 5k a week and it's possible to clear 1k on Uber x in 20 hours?
I mean, I can kick ass out there, but 5k a week that's working 2000 hours a week.
 

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Drivers are undercompensated and miss classified employees, and uncompensated investors.

Yes, investors too. We provide a "loan" of our vehicles (our capital) to Uber and Lyft but receive no future profit or equity in return. These two TNCs have leveraged our vehicles (capital) and our butts in the driver's seat for their benefit. Everyone at Uber and Lyft including their investors know this.

And yes, I still drive because I think I'm smarter than the average bear but in my gut know I'm an idiot.
 

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Same here, but with that new surge process coming, you just might starve.

Read some of these threads about that new surge process, and it will blow your mind.
I heard about it but didn't really look into it till just now. Wow. That is robbery. I wonder what the effect has been with drivers. If everyone just switched to lyft or quit. Man I hope they don't do that here. I don't really like lyft.
 

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I heard about it but didn't really look into it till just now. Wow. That is robbery. I wonder what the effect has been with drivers. If everyone just switched to lyft or quit. Man I hope they don't do that here. I don't really like lyft.
Lyft, put it in Tampa, Detroit, and Seattle. The drivers in Tampa, aren't picking up the paxs anymore , so the paxs moved to Uber as it's long wait times on Lyft.
 

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Lyft, put it in Tampa, Detroit, and Seattle. The drivers in Tampa, aren't picking up the paxs anymore , so the paxs moved to Uber as it's long wait times on Lyft.
Well there ya go. Hopefully they have the sense to realize that if one rideshare company adopts this and the other doesn't follow, the company will collapse. It's just too awful.
 

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Do you guys really struggle to make ends meet? Seems to me that if you even have half an idea about what you're doing you can make $1,000 a week working 40 hours. Buy a 10 year old Prius and your costs are low. In fact, with the tax benefits of the mileage deduction, expenses pretty much cancel out.

Don't get me wrong, I've got a lot of complaints about Uber, but I'm definitely not about to starve or anything.
It's pretty hard to really make money (after gas, maintenance, proper insurance, and dead miles) at under a $1 per mile fares.

I'd also add the 90 something percent of people that don't work 40 hours at it might be because some hours of the day have no work available in their market.
 

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It's pretty hard to really make money (after gas, maintenance, proper insurance, and dead miles) at under a $1 per mile fares.

I'd also add the 90 something percent of people that don't work 40 hours at it might be because some hours of the day have no work available in their market.
Well this was an LA specific study so it's talking about drivers in the LA market. Like I said though, even a middle of the road driver should be able to hit about $1k a week. Even with a new car, which you really shouldn't have, how much can your expenses possibly be?
 

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It's pretty hard to really make money (after gas, maintenance, proper insurance, and dead miles) at under a $1 per mile fares.

I'd also add the 90 something percent of people that don't work 40 hours at it might be because some hours of the day have no work available in their market.
I use to work everyday, but I don't anymore as it's slow, and gas is too high. Most drivers don't make much money doing this. .
 

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