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Sounds like just another person that thinks the world owes them a living.
Instead of disparaging about a "class war" going on, maybe she should use it as a wake up call that she should upgrade her skills so maybe she might actually be worth more than a mule to her current or potentially future employers.
 

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Sounds like just another person that thinks the world owes them a living.
Instead of disparaging about a "class war" going on, maybe she should use it as a wake up call that she should upgrade her skills so maybe she might actually be worth more than a mule to her current or potentially future employers.
we're still not telling you our secrets.
 

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Sounds like just another person that thinks the world owes them a living.
Instead of disparaging about a "class war" going on, maybe she should use it as a wake up call that she should upgrade her skills so maybe she might actually be worth more than a mule to her current or potentially future employers.
I sympathize with your position that people should take personal responsibility for their lives and futures but:

If this gig economy continues to grow it could push aside regular jobs. If that happens there won't be the same ability to climb the employment ladder. If the incumbent employers corner the market of all the new, emerging product and service opportunities then they will permanently control the sources of jobs and can dictate wages. It is now easier to do this than in the past because technical expertise and capital are even more important in developing a product or service. These are two things an upstart doesn't have.

Here's my personal example: I started an Internet company in 1995. That was before Bell, Rogers, in fact it was before anyone in the area (Georgetown). It was dial-up and we couldn't keep up to the technology. We didn't have the capital, the market positioning or the time to match the larger players. The thing that really hurt us at the first was that the phone companies could offer attractive phone/Internet bundles which we couldn't match. This is the power of the incumbent. They are pre-positioned to take over a market space and there is little that small players can do about it.

This dynamic happened to us again with the filtering analysis software we developed. This class of software became the core of Sarbanes-Oxley devices, devices to store and retrieve emails. In our implementation it was a spam filter. I lost a lot of money and about 4 years on that effort.

The point is that, in practice, the market is not open. As a society we have to decide who owns things. On the one side we have a rigid communism on the other we have anarchy: a nightmare of rigid property laws, private police forces and the exploitation of the vulnerable. I call myself a socialist so I side with a sharing of the social space. I side with fairness and care for the old, sick, handicapped, children, the yet to be born, and, yes, the ordinary worker who maybe can't do much upgrading of skills.

There are trickle down myths that blind us to the truth. The idea of progress combined with Laissez- Faire economics can become the ridiculous notion that we live in the best-of-all-possible-worlds. It's circular: it is this way because it's best and it's best because it is this way. We see the successes but not the failures. We see the present because it is here, now, in front of us, but we don't see the might-have-beens because they never came about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
I sympathize with your position that people should take personal responsibility for their lives and futures but:

If this gig economy continues to grow it could push aside regular jobs. If that happens there won't be the same ability to climb the employment ladder. If the incumbent employers corner the market of all the new, emerging product and service opportunities then they will permanently control the sources of jobs and can dictate wages. It is now easier to do this than in the past because technical expertise and capital are even more important in developing a product or service. These are two things an upstart doesn't have.

Here's my personal example: I started an Internet company in 1995. That was before Bell, Rogers, in fact it was before anyone in the area (Georgetown). It was dial-up and we couldn't keep up to the technology. We didn't have the capital, the market positioning or the time to match the larger players. The thing that really hurt us at the first was that the phone companies could offer attractive phone/Internet bundles which we couldn't match. This is the power of the incumbent. They are pre-positioned to take over a market space and there is little that small players can do about it.

This dynamic happened to us again with the filtering analysis software we developed. This class of software became the core of Sarbanes-Oxley devices, devices to store and retrieve emails. In our implementation it was a spam filter. I lost a lot of money and about 4 years on that effort.

The point is that, in practice, the market is not open. As a society we have to decide who owns things. On the one side we have a rigid communism on the other we have anarchy: a nightmare of rigid property laws, private police forces and the exploitation of the vulnerable. I call myself a socialist so I side with a sharing of the social space. I side with fairness and care for the old, sick, handicapped, children, the yet to be born, and, yes, the ordinary worker who maybe can't do much upgrading of skills.

There are trickle down myths that blind us to the truth. The idea of progress combined with Laissez- Faire economics can become the ridiculous notion that we live in the best-of-all-possible-worlds. It's circular: it is this way because it's best and it's best because it is this way. We see the successes but not the failures. We see the present because it here, now, in front of us, but we don't see the might-have-beens because they never came about.
Jobs in the gig economy don't even cover the basic costs of food, shelter or a work life balance. In fact this new economy is really digital feudalism and a harkening back to slave plantations and share cropping which in more ways represents contract workers today. The 'be your own boss' is a myth that is perpetuated through clever controlled media saturation by the gig propagandists. The anger and resentment is building not just in a Lyft and Uber context but in every aspect of the service economy. In industry and especially now the gig economy in construction it has firmly planted this mentality to drywall workers, painters, framing, etc. What were once moderate paying jobs paying 35 to 40 an hour are now 18 dollar an hour occupations with no benefits and enormous risks.

The work life balance of workers post 2nd World War has been completely subverted is favour of the gig workplace. Being a citizen in your community is the preserve of the privileged classes who have different immediate concerns than just barely making a living. With 45% of Americans working at full and part time jobs, most are just barley living at the subsistence level. There is alarm that the next economic shock, the equivalent of the 08 collapse, could mean a huge swath of Americans might not respond so meekly to austerity next time around.

The continued dysfunction of the body politic and growing economic inequality in the U.S. is now a recipe for social collapse. Watching the largest modern industrial economy devolve into chaos and anarchy is a concern to not just Canadians but rather the entire world.

As we witness the end of civility south of the border we will begin to watch the great unravelling of a once proud and innovative republic. My biggest fear now is that Trump will indeed be found guilty of collusion and that his base will be...well err be," fired up." We are already seeing this manifested in a unprecedented number of hate crimes that Trump is sanctifying. This master of diversion will do anything to keep himself from being impeached and or family from being put in jail. The despair of the American people is palpable.
 

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...occupations with no benefits and enormous risks.
Yes, I hurt my back about a month ago and have had to curtail my driving. I can only drive a few hours now and have to stay close to home. It's not getting better so I think I will have to stop driving altogether for a while.
 

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Yes, I hurt my back about a month ago and have had to curtail my driving. I can only drive a few hours now and have to stay close to home. It's not getting better so I think I will have to stop driving altogether for a while.
Be well
 

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Best regards for a quick recovery.
Thanks. Here's a Plan B that most people can benefit from: If your income suddenly drops one thing you can do is cut your living costs. If you withdraw yourself from the give and take of commerce you can reduce your outflow by doing things yourself. If you do things that you would otherwise pay someone else to do then that is as good as getting paid to do (your own) work. It's the other side of the same economic coin; the left hand side of the ledger.

Youtube is your friend. You can repair things you would otherwise replace, you can give yourself better meals, you can take time to do the little things you have put off. I prefer to think of my little hiatus from work in a positive light. When you are putting in big hours doing rideshare you can become blind to the larger world. I'm doing well with little jobs that come my way. I think the French call it bricolage. By not spending unnecessarily my life hasn't been affected much. I works for me but might not work as well for everyone. In my case I own a house, my wife works and my kids are grown so my expenses are low.

I suppose if enough people dropped out we would have a serious decline in the economy. That happened in 1929. Such is unregulated capitalism.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Thanks. Here's a Plan B that most people can benefit from: If your income suddenly drops one thing you can do is cut your living costs. If you withdraw yourself from the give and take of commerce you can reduce your outflow by doing things yourself. If you do things that you would otherwise pay someone else to do then that is as good as getting paid to do (your own) work. It's the other side of the same economic coin; the left hand side of the ledger.

Youtube is your friend. You can repair things you would otherwise replace, you can give yourself better meals, you can take time to do the little things you have put off. I prefer to think of my little hiatus from work in a positive light. When you are putting in big hours doing rideshare you can become blind to the larger world. I'm doing well with little jobs that come my way. I think the French call it bricolage. By not spending unnecessarily my life hasn't been affected much. I works for me but might not work as well for everyone. In my case I own a house, my wife works and my kids are grown so my expenses are low.

I suppose if enough people dropped out we would have a serious decline in the economy. That happened in 1929. Such is unregulated capitalism.
I am just back from buying protective gloves (3.56 @ Canadian Tire ) to repair and repoint my century plus foundation with mortar. Found the videos on YT and they are exceedingly detailed and step by step informative. The number of times I have used the internet in the past year for DIY are too numerous to recount. The only thing I won't do is electrical. The gig economy has in many ways pushed people into a self sufficient direction. Although it is probably not the best use of ones time considering people that have these skills already are much more efficient and expert. I recall repairing my cement sills a few years ago while having a new brick wall built by a masonry contractor. When he returned on Monday to continue the wall he was a taken aback by me having built ( over the weekend ) the footings and pouring the concrete, smoothing and slopping the sills. He asked how I knew what to do, I told him it was all on YT.

That said I would definitely rather be reading, writing and contemplating the end of capitalism and its' eventual replacement. As the economy lurches from one disaster to the next over the upcoming months it is important that although being ready and humble to do things on our own we should remember that many people are not quite as fortunate. Most of us who have the resources to function in a very much different world than we grew up in must remember that we still need an orderly civilization. I am horrified at the preparation movement and I think it is endemic of the hopelessness and despair many Americans feel about their broken economic and political system. Like the DYI movement many of us now embrace I think we should also start doing political DYI in our local communities.
 

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Today I am replacing capacitors on an old Prius speedometer and on a 10 amp battery charger. With the speedometer repair I went to Youtube to find out how to do surface-mount soldering. Most people would throw out that car charger but it only needs a dollar's worth of parts. One less item discarded.

While it may be more efficient to specialize there is an advantage to DIY. It is confidence building, food for the brain and a movement to "slow" which is relaxing and allows us to see things more broadly.

It's a mugs game predicting the future but let me throw this out: Small scale manufacture may move into the home with the advent of 3D printers. I wonder what that will do to the work landscape.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Today I am replacing capacitors on an old Prius speedometer and on a 10 amp battery charger. With the speedometer repair I went to Youtube to find out how to do surface-mount soldering. Most people would throw out that car charger but it only needs a dollar's worth of parts. One less item discarded.

While it may be more efficient to specialize there is an advantage to DIY. It is confidence building, food for the brain and a movement to "slow" which is relaxing and allows us to see things more broadly.

It's a mugs game predicting the future but let me throw this out: Small scale manufacture may move into the home with the advent of 3D printers. I wonder what that will do to the work landscape.
I concur with the "Slow" movement and also the self satisfaction of doing something you think only the experts should or can do. I don't subscribe to the 10K hypothesis to become an expert unless your a musician playing a complex composition. I do recall my 1st boss saying I needed at least five years of working before I should even think of management as a next career step. I did try it and absolutely hated managing people. Having the same expectations of your self and imposing it on others is madness.

You look at all the people that Trump has been through in his first year in office and it is absolute craziness in the first order. That Trump could think he was expert in such complex areas of trade and commerce, macroeconomics, nuclear deterrence and defence, immigration and the legal system is the stuff of late night commentary. I don't think there isn't a morning when I don't look at any of the broad sheets before I watch snippets of Stephen Colbert. I think many of us have turned to comedians to make sense of the nonsensical.

I however do know one thing for sure, we'll all wake up one morning and Colbert will be reporting straight faced something incredibly news worthy where even Colbert will find words difficult to explain the truly most awful thing that Trump has ever done or is about to do. Needless to say and we all think about this daily and that is Trump has committed treason. Not sure how the American people will react and act to this sordid news.

 

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Speaking of which, I need a Root Canal, but I'm too broke to go to the dentist...remember: I'm an Uber Driver. So I'm going to fire up YouTube and see how I can do a DIY Root Canal procedure.

Now where did I put that power drill?
obviously there are limits of what you can do.... that's why he did mention for example he isn't doing any electrical work. Myself with a car, there are some repairs I feel comfortable making, others I do not, and rather take it to the shop.
 

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Thanks. Here's a Plan B that most people can benefit from: If your income suddenly drops one thing you can do is cut your living costs. If you withdraw yourself from the give and take of commerce you can reduce your outflow by doing things yourself. If you do things that you would otherwise pay someone else to do then that is as good as getting paid to do (your own) work. It's the other side of the same economic coin; the left hand side of the ledger.

Youtube is your friend. You can repair things you would otherwise replace, you can give yourself better meals, you can take time to do the little things you have put off. I prefer to think of my little hiatus from work in a positive light. When you are putting in big hours doing rideshare you can become blind to the larger world. I'm doing well with little jobs that come my way. I think the French call it bricolage. By not spending unnecessarily my life hasn't been affected much. I works for me but might not work as well for everyone. In my case I own a house, my wife works and my kids are grown so my expenses are low.

I suppose if enough people dropped out we would have a serious decline in the economy. That happened in 1929. Such is unregulated capitalism.
You need more money is the issue

Your can only save so much

Work at the bar
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
obviously there are limits of what you can do.... that's why he did mention for example he isn't doing any electrical work. Myself with a car, there are some repairs I feel comfortable making, others I do not, and rather take it to the shop.
Have been around vehicles all my life, tractors, combines, motorcycles and small engines. I remember being on an island during a cruise and rented a motorcycle and went to the other end of the island. On our return to the ship the engine wouldn't start and my wife was terribly worried we wouldn't start the engine, frankly so was I, a dead battery. I scooted up a small hill and bumped started it. The look on her face was priceless!
 
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