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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Certainly, in the millions, if not, tens of millions.

I was out driving around SE Connecticut and stopped at a couple of stores: Wal-Mart and Big Y. There were employees, but no shoppers. A 7-Eleven that is usually open 24-7 was closed along with several other gas stations-convenience stores that would normally be open in the morning.

This whole thing about a governor "closing roads" or "banning travel" is a recent phenomenon here in New England. I think a lot of the blame can be placed on the media for hyping up the potential devastation that could occur, perhaps, in part, for ratings. But, also, a general trend towards governments to exert more control over the governed a la the ever-expanding "nanny-state"; especially by Democrats.

I'm 53 and was born and raised in Southern New England. We always knew what to do for bad weather; prepare and wait it out if necessary. But we also had the responsibility to decide if we were going to venture out if we chose to do so, understanding the risks.

If this keeps up, this latest generation is going to expect the government to make all their decisions for them. But who wants the responsibility of making their own decisions? Certainly not Millennials. If they could, they would run everything in their lives from an app on their smartphone. And when service was not available, they would just retreat to their "safe space" until someone told them it was OK to come out.

America: No longer the Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave.

More like: Land of the Kept and Home of the Slave.
 

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Certainly, in the millions, if not, tens of millions.

I was out driving around SE Connecticut and stopped at a couple of stores: Wal-Mart and Big Y. There were employees, but no shoppers. A 7-Eleven that is usually open 24-7 was closed along with several other gas stations-convenience stores that would normally be open in the morning.

This whole thing about a governor "closing roads" or "banning travel" is a recent phenomenon here in New England. I think a lot of the blame can be placed on the media for hyping up the potential devastation that could occur, perhaps, in part, for ratings. But, also, a general trend towards governments to exert more control over the governed a la the ever-expanding "nanny-state"; especially by Democrats.

I'm 53 and was born and raised in Southern New England. We always knew what to do for bad weather; prepare and wait it out if necessary. But we also had the responsibility to decide if we were going to venture out if we chose to do so, understanding the risks.

If this keeps up, this latest generation is going to expect the government to make all their decisions for them. But who wants the responsibility of making their own decisions? Certainly not Millennials. If they could, they would run everything in their lives from an app on their smartphone. And when service was not available, they would just retreat to their "safe space" until someone told them it was OK to come out.

America: No longer the Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave.

More like: Land of the Kept and Home of the Slave.
Little melodramatic are we? This is a major snowstorm and he told non essential personnel to stay off the roads so that the plows could get ahead of it, clean stuff up, keep people safe and return to normal as fast as possible, all of which will help economic activity get back to normal faster than it otherwise would.

I'm all for keeping government directives at bay but this seems like a common sense temporary directive. It's not like you're going to get arrested for driving anywhere today, it's more for the common good people stay the hell off the roads and let the clean up go as fast as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Little melodramatic are we? This is a major snowstorm and he told non essential personnel to stay off the roads so that the plows could get ahead of it, clean stuff up, keep people safe and return to normal as fast as possible, all of which will help economic activity get back to normal faster than it otherwise would.

I'm all for keeping government directives at bay but this seems like a common sense temporary directive. It's not like you're going to get arrested for driving anywhere today, it's more for the common good people stay the hell off the roads and let the clean up go as fast as possible.
In other words: You just don't get it.

Two questions: How old are you, and where did you grow up?
 

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Which is worse?
  • Governor takes the blame because he is told by experts that predictions justify issuing a travel ban, but the experts are wrong and tens of millions in income is lost.
  • Governor takes the blame because he is told by experts that predictions do not justify issuing a travel ban, but the experts are wrong and hundreds of avoidable accidents, injuries and deaths result.
  • Governor takes the blame even when correct because something could have gone better or faster and that is what Governors are for.
Either way, fewer cars on the road makes cleanup go much faster and more efficiently.
 

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Certainly, in the millions, if not, tens of millions.

I was out driving around SE Connecticut and stopped at a couple of stores: Wal-Mart and Big Y. There were employees, but no shoppers. A 7-Eleven that is usually open 24-7 was closed along with several other gas stations-convenience stores that would normally be open in the morning.

This whole thing about a governor "closing roads" or "banning travel" is a recent phenomenon here in New England. I think a lot of the blame can be placed on the media for hyping up the potential devastation that could occur, perhaps, in part, for ratings. But, also, a general trend towards governments to exert more control over the governed a la the ever-expanding "nanny-state"; especially by Democrats.

I'm 53 and was born and raised in Southern New England. We always knew what to do for bad weather; prepare and wait it out if necessary. But we also had the responsibility to decide if we were going to venture out if we chose to do so, understanding the risks.

If this keeps up, this latest generation is going to expect the government to make all their decisions for them. But who wants the responsibility of making their own decisions? Certainly not Millennials. If they could, they would run everything in their lives from an app on their smartphone. And when service was not available, they would just retreat to their "safe space" until someone told them it was OK to come out.

America: No longer the Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave.

More like: Land of the Kept and Home of the Slave.
I'm not a fan of the nanny state either, but I think the governor made the right call based on conditions I've seen in the central part of the state today. Snow plowing is very inefficient when there is more than a few cars on the road. The snow plows have just barely been able to keep up with the snowfall rate today. If they were doing their job less efficiently, the snow would be piling up on the roads and travel would only be possible with 4 wheel drive and/or tire chains. You would end up with lots of vehicles getting stuck and blocking roads, which further impairs snow removal efforts. To sum up, the state is not responsible for protecting people from their own foolish travel decisions. However, the state is responsible for maintaining the roads in a safe and passable condition. Under extreme weather conditions it is occasionally necessary to restrict travel so that the state can fulfill its obligation to maintain the roads.
 

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Malloy is a A hole - screw him

This was no significant storm - massive invasion of our liberty interest and freedom of movement
 
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