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Alright. I'm sure someone here knows an estimated answer, minus variables such as year and size vehicle, city/ highway / idle etc.

Just curious, without doing my own research of logging miles etc regarding fuel consumption.

Anyone know the difference in fill ups, gas expense increases while blasting the air cond on these nice hot days? (Bet Map has an answer)
 

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Thanks. Good link with a decent answer reduced by approx 25% especially on Short trips.
You should take heed in whatever that bimmer driving moderator have to say, or in this case provided link. 25% hit on fuel mileage is on the extreme end with all the variables pushing the max. Did you notice the government didn't provide the test vehicle in how they've reached their conclusion?

That same gov site suggests having windows up and AC on during highway driving. Did you know having windows partially down (most people wouldn't have it fully down) during highway speed is "estimated" to affect fuel mileage by about 10-15% @ 55 mph? Having said that, why in the world would the gov suggest having AC on, windows up during highway driving when by their own misleading estimate is +10-15% inefficient?

Ignore the 25% hit, it's pure propaganda. Modern auto AC are very efficient. 10+ year old 5 series bimmers the MOD drives...probably not.
 

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You should take heed in whatever that bimmer driving moderator have to say, or in this case provided link. 25% hit on fuel mileage is on the extreme end with all the variables pushing the max. Did you notice the government didn't provide the test vehicle in how they've reached their conclusion?

That same gov site suggests having windows up and AC on during highway driving. Did you know having windows partially down (most people wouldn't have it fully down) during highway speed is "estimated" to affect fuel mileage by about 10-15% @ 55 mph? Having said that, why in the world would the gov suggest having AC on, windows up during highway driving when by their own misleading estimate is +10-15% inefficient?

Ignore the 25% hit, it's pure propaganda. Modern auto AC are very efficient. 10+ year old 5 series bimmers the MOD drives...probably not.
Mary Mary, so contrary...

For the record, it's a 7 series. Also for the record, the article was purposely non specific as to make/model. I notice you don't cite any sources. But I would be interested if you had any.
Can you post anything?

Of course, they didn't post data for every possible car, but it is a good reference. I would also hazard a guess that if you took any model car, and looked at the factory parts list, you probably would see the HVAC parts are largely interchangeable over a given 6, 8 or more years. Manufacturers don't generally make dramatic changes any more rapidly than that.
 

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Charging a Smartphone While Driving Isn't as Free as You Think
By Jeff Green
January 12, 2016, 5:00 AM EST
Handsets plugged into car ports cut mileage, boost pollution
It also costs 33 times more than using outlets at home
It's not just using a handheld phone while driving that's a menace to society. It turns out that charging it in the car has consequences too.

That's because a phone drawing electricity from a USB port cuts 0.03 miles from each gallon of gasoline in a tank. Across the fleet of vehicles in the U.S., that would mean about 970,000 tons of extra planet-warming carbon dioxide a year, according to calculations by Jon Bereisa, a retired General Motors Co. engineering executive who studies vehicle power usage. With a race under way to see how many charging ports automakers can cram into a car, the increased pollution is only going to get worse.

"Do I think we're at peak USB? No," said Mary Gustanski, vice president of engineering and program management at Delphi Automotive Plc, which makes wiring and USB ports for vehicles. "We'll get more and more creative to not only allow you to connect with USB but also to connect wireless. Consumers want their car to be just like their home."

It's not just an environmental issue, either. The proliferation of consumer devices, the growth of dashboard touch screens and other technology, and the shrinking size of engines to meet fuel-economy mandates mean the 12-volt automobile electrical system is just about tapped out. Some automakers are already turning to supplemental 48-volt systems in future models.

Port Proliferation

The number of vehicles sold in the U.S. with USB charge ports rose to about 14.6 million last year from about 3.3 million in 2005, the first year they were available, and is projected to climb to 16.7 million by 2022, according to a forecast from the consulting firm IHS. Global sales of vehicles with USB ports will increase to 85 million in 2022 from about 49 million last year, IHS said.

That estimate doesn't capture how many ports are in a particular vehicle. For example, the new Chrysler Pacifica minivan, which goes on sale later this year, will have nine USB charging points, the most of any automobile, said Bruce Velisek, director of Chrysler brand product marketing. The model it replaces has four charging points, he said.

To make his calculation, Bereisa assumed that a typical smartphone connected to WiFi or the Internet needs about 4.8 watts of energy to charge in a car. (Delphi estimates that some less-efficient models draw twice that amount.) For a vehicle getting about 30 miles per gallon, that's a 0.03 mpg loss, he said. Spread out across about 3 trillion road miles motorists drive each year in the U.S. -- assuming an average speed of 30 mph -- the estimated extra usage is 100 million gallons of gasoline, or about $200 million in costs, said Bereisa, the chief executive officer of Auto Electrification LLC in Sunrise Beach, Missouri.

Home Charging

The estimated extra CO2 created by plugging in one phone in every car in the U.S. would be about the same as that produced by 185,257 passenger vehicles in one year, according to an Environmental Protection Agency website that converts greenhouse gas into real-world equivalents. Put another way, that's the pollution created by burning 945 million pounds of coal.

By far, the cheapest way to charge a smartphone is at home, Bereisa said. With gasoline at $2 a gallon, it costs about 2 cents an hour to charge a phone in a car compared with about 0.06 cent at home, or 33 times less. Gasoline would have to fall to 6 cents a gallon to compete with home electricity, he said. It would also produce about half the carbon dioxide.

"That's why modern electricity power plants are not driven by gasoline engine generators," said Bereisa, who worked on the EV-1 and Volt electric-vehicle programs and fuel-cell models during his 35 years at GM. "We go through life without realizing how important energy is to everything we do, and the consequences of our energy consumption. We grow up entitled to just plug it in or flip the switch or push start -- with no idea of what's behind it all."

(For more coverage of the Detroit auto show, see {SHOW <GO>}.)
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Premium Member
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Bloomberg
Business
Charging a Smartphone While Driving Isn't as Free as You Think
By Jeff Green
January 12, 2016, 5:00 AM EST
Handsets plugged into car ports cut mileage, boost pollution
It also costs 33 times more than using outlets at home
It's not just using a handheld phone while driving that's a menace to society. It turns out that charging it in the car has consequences too.

That's because a phone drawing electricity from a USB port cuts 0.03 miles from each gallon of gasoline in a tank. Across the fleet of vehicles in the U.S., that would mean about 970,000 tons of extra planet-warming carbon dioxide a year, according to calculations by Jon Bereisa, a retired General Motors Co. engineering executive who studies vehicle power usage. With a race under way to see how many charging ports automakers can cram into a car, the increased pollution is only going to get worse.

"Do I think we're at peak USB? No," said Mary Gustanski, vice president of engineering and program management at Delphi Automotive Plc, which makes wiring and USB ports for vehicles. "We'll get more and more creative to not only allow you to connect with USB but also to connect wireless. Consumers want their car to be just like their home."

It's not just an environmental issue, either. The proliferation of consumer devices, the growth of dashboard touch screens and other technology, and the shrinking size of engines to meet fuel-economy mandates mean the 12-volt automobile electrical system is just about tapped out. Some automakers are already turning to supplemental 48-volt systems in future models.

Port Proliferation

The number of vehicles sold in the U.S. with USB charge ports rose to about 14.6 million last year from about 3.3 million in 2005, the first year they were available, and is projected to climb to 16.7 million by 2022, according to a forecast from the consulting firm IHS. Global sales of vehicles with USB ports will increase to 85 million in 2022 from about 49 million last year, IHS said.

That estimate doesn't capture how many ports are in a particular vehicle. For example, the new Chrysler Pacifica minivan, which goes on sale later this year, will have nine USB charging points, the most of any automobile, said Bruce Velisek, director of Chrysler brand product marketing. The model it replaces has four charging points, he said.

To make his calculation, Bereisa assumed that a typical smartphone connected to WiFi or the Internet needs about 4.8 watts of energy to charge in a car. (Delphi estimates that some less-efficient models draw twice that amount.) For a vehicle getting about 30 miles per gallon, that's a 0.03 mpg loss, he said. Spread out across about 3 trillion road miles motorists drive each year in the U.S. -- assuming an average speed of 30 mph -- the estimated extra usage is 100 million gallons of gasoline, or about $200 million in costs, said Bereisa, the chief executive officer of Auto Electrification LLC in Sunrise Beach, Missouri.

Home Charging

The estimated extra CO2 created by plugging in one phone in every car in the U.S. would be about the same as that produced by 185,257 passenger vehicles in one year, according to an Environmental Protection Agency website that converts greenhouse gas into real-world equivalents. Put another way, that's the pollution created by burning 945 million pounds of coal.

By far, the cheapest way to charge a smartphone is at home, Bereisa said. With gasoline at $2 a gallon, it costs about 2 cents an hour to charge a phone in a car compared with about 0.06 cent at home, or 33 times less. Gasoline would have to fall to 6 cents a gallon to compete with home electricity, he said. It would also produce about half the carbon dioxide.

"That's why modern electricity power plants are not driven by gasoline engine generators," said Bereisa, who worked on the EV-1 and Volt electric-vehicle programs and fuel-cell models during his 35 years at GM. "We go through life without realizing how important energy is to everything we do, and the consequences of our energy consumption. We grow up entitled to just plug it in or flip the switch or push start -- with no idea of what's behind it all."

(For more coverage of the Detroit auto show, see {SHOW <GO>}.)
Have a confidential news tip? Get in touch with our reporters. Before it's here, it's on the Bloomberg Terminal. LEARN MORE
Terms of Service Trademarks Privacy Policy ©2018 Bloomberg L.P. All Rights Reserved
Careers Made in NYC Advertise Ad Choices Contact Us Help
Very interesting read. Thank you for sharing, Leroy.

find out how many watts your ac uses. a gallon of gas is x joules. and your alternator is y% efficient. too lazy to look up everything right now.

but the math will be like this..https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...hone-while-driving-isn-t-as-free-as-you-think
I think the math might require more than you suggest. Your looking at the electrical draw for the fan, and on more sophisticated systems, the climate control. But there is also the mechanical load when the clutch on the compressor is engaged.
 
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