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you don't get bumped for being obnoxious.

Note that nothing you have posted here will help a single driver avoid being, um... taken for a ride.

In the 3 years I've been driving I've received two phone calls from Uber. One from someone at corporate who I don't know, and the other from the ops manager in my city.
It depends on.........oh, never mind.....................................

Is it not a shame that not everyone is as "smart" as some people?

In the same time, I have had three: two from the Operations Manager and one from Corporate. Usually, they prefer to communicate by e-Mail, but they had some questions about the accessible taxis. Uber addresses the demand for accessible service, here, through the Uber Taxi platform. The TNCs pay a one per-cent tax on all trips that originate or terminate in the District of Columbia. The City Council has earmarked this tax for grants to cab drivers who will purchase accessible vehicles and service the demand for that. One of the conditions for receiving a grant is that the driver must affiliate with a "dispatch service". Uber Taxi is one of the "approved dispatch services". Uber figures that since it is paying for these taxis, it might as well get some use out of them.

Be that as it may, a local do-gooder organisation is suing Uber for not providing accessible service through the UberX/Uber Pool or Uber Black platform. As Uber is not much for actually going to court (that jacks up the legal bills considerably), I suspect that it will settle partly by agreeing to provide UberWAV or Uber Assist in this market (which currently it does not do). I do hope that this does not contribute to Uber's discontinuing Uber Taxi here. Once Uber settles, these do-gooders will turn their attention first to Lyft then to VIA and any other little TNC. This is how they have operated in the past. I have had my innings with this group. Some of their practices have been labelled as somewhat less than what some might consider proper.

First... Uber needs to send out an email. Banks do this whenever there's a phishing problem
Third I speculate new driver the main target
Another question does a number show up or is no ID or unknown
I would wonder, as well, why Uber has not sent out such an e-Mail.
According to the article and Original Poster, the scam has been tried on more than a few veteran drivers. Several drivers of varying tenure on the Washington Boards have reported this scam.
Drivers who have had this scam attempted or successfully put over on them have reported that it is a dummy Uber number. This is what leads them to suspect that the scammers actually order a vehicle then target the driver whom the program has assigned their request.
 

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Right - You know what I'm taking about and I don't.
Another of your helpful observations here on the site.
Note that nothing you have posted here will help a single driver avoid being, um... taken for a ride.
Exhibit A:
Really no need for this. Don't give out personal info and no one can touch your money.
I have no problem with trying to warn people about scams going around. But this really isn't something new. It's just being tweaked for uber drivers. Others are tweaked for people wanting a cheap/free vacation, or elderly retired people, etc etc. The bottom line which I stated is don't give out your username and password. For anything!
If people do that, they'll have to find a different and bit more difficult way to take your money.

But you seemed to not have liked my answers and stated that these people hadn't given out their info, when in the article they clearly admit to having done so.
You had to know your were going to get called out for that
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 · (Edited)
The scammers are using the Uber Rider app to contact the driver, so the number is a Twilio masked number - just like that of a real rider.

So far, from what I can make of it, it works like this:
  • Scammer uses the Uber rider app to drop a pin somewhere and request a ride.
  • Driver accepts the ride request and starts to travel towards the pick-up.
  • Scammer initiates a phone call to the driver through the CONTACT - CALL feature of the rider app.
  • Driver answers the call - and this creates the tunnel connection between the phones.
  • Scammer says they are calling from Uber, that they see you are on your way to pick-up a rider named 'whatever'...
Even if you're suspicious, you think, 'who would know this if it wasn't someone from Uber?'
Remember you're attention is being pulled in several directions at once at this point - you're driving, you're following the GPS to the pick-up, you're talking on the phone
At this point it is not exactly clear what happens next, because it appears that different scammers are using different methods.

The less sophisticated scammer will engage you in a conversation and request that you verify your login username/password. (I hope no one gives out their info to anyone who asks!).

The scammer may send you a link and ask you to login to your Uber account (for whatever reason they have told you - a bonus, for security purposes, etc.). Since you're using a phone, busy driving, busy on the phone, busy following the GPS, you may not 'see' the URL you are opening is not an Uber.com URL.


And in other VERIFIED* cases, more sophisticated scammers are using a hack to access the data on your phone (this is the most dangerous - and good reason to end the call as soon as possible). If you get this kind of scammer calling you, you will be 'hit' without ever having provided your account info or 'logging in' to a fake Uber login. You won't know what hit you until you notice your earnings have been withdrawn from your Uber account using Instant Pay.

* I interviewed four drivers in my market who have received the scammers calls. One verified that the $ available in his Uber account were withdrawn and that he never gave anyone his login info or entered any login info on his phone or through a web form.
That's it - the scammer now has your login credentials. And they know that you're probably smart enough to figure out by now this is a scam of some kind, so they do the fastest thing they can do: they change your banking info to their own and then withdraw your current earnings via Instant Pay.

UBER IS FULLY AWARE OF THESE SCAMS
and has done nothing yet to inform drivers about it
 
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And in other
VERIFIED*
cases,
more sophisticated scammers are using a hack
to access the data on your phone (this is the most dangerous - and good reason to end the call as soon as possible).
If you get this kind of scammer calling you, you will be 'hit' without ever having provided your account info
or 'logging in' to a fake Uber login. You won't know what hit you until you notice your earnings have been withdrawn from your Uber account using Instant Pay.​

* I interviewed four drivers in my market who have received the scammers calls. One verified that the $ available in his Uber account were withdrawn and that he never gave anyone his login info or entered any login info on his phone or through a web form

I received a ping to-day. The address read "Touch here to accept redeem reward prize money" followed by some gibberish. The last words on it were "claim service reward". As I will not accept half the pings that show a range of addresses, I certainly was not going to accept this one. I let it expire.
I wonder if this was a scam ping.

At about 1600 yesterday, a call came into the wireless telephone that I use for Uber and the cab. It was a Sunnyvale, California number. Sunnyvale is where the original Silicon Valley is located. In fact, I remember when the original Silicon Valley was empty streets, empty grassy lots and empty railroad sidings on the other side of the Southern Pacific tracks. The Libby's cannery still canned peaches and when it was doing so, you could smell it all the way to San Bruno on the North, Campbell on the South and Alviso to the East. I did not work yesterday (GF had to go to the doctor and we had a Nationals game at six P.M.), but it was curious that a Sunnyvale number called me then. Scammers?​
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
When Uber wants to verify your identity, they prompt you to allow access to your phone camera and then smile for a photo when you try and log in.
That's only how the APP verifies your ID - no one who has ever called me from Uber has ever been able to initiate that image ID verification. Maybe it's been different for others?
 

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First... Uber needs to send out an email. Banks do this whenever there's a phishing problem
Second for new drivers training video include this and stress Uber NEVER calls IRS does this
Third I speculate new driver the main target
Fourth make YouTube video Uber may not like this
Finally Seinfeld it and tell them you'll call them back
Another question does a number show up or is no ID or unknown
I've received 3 separate emails from Uber warning me of this scam that I can recall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I've received 3 separate emails from Uber warning me of this scam that I can recall.
Good to hear - and I'd love to see them - can you share them here?
Our region has been 100% silent on the issue!
 

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Good to hear - and I'd love to see them - can you share them here?
Our region has been 100% silent on the issue!
I have not kept the emails and I've cleared my delete folder since the last email was sent. I also recall it being on the app itself as one of their informational boxes on the bottom of the map screen (that you swipe up to review).
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
I have not kept the emails and I've cleared my delete folder since the last email was sent. I also recall it being on the app itself as one of their informational boxes on the bottom of the map screen (that you swipe up to review).
Well, your regional Uber/Raiser Ops Manager is more on the ball than any others.
If anyone has these emails or a screenshot of an in-app warning, please post here and/or to the NOTIFICATIONS section!
 

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It happened to me the other day. Until I started reading these posts, I honestly thought it was the customer trying to get a no-show fee waived. Pretty much the same line, after I received a call as soon as I got to the location I received a call (through Uber's scrambled #) that I had won a $200 bonus because of my many compliments. All I had to do was pull to the side, and cancel the trip by pressing the "Do Not Charge the Rider" button. However like I said, I thought it was the rider trying to skirt his way out of a no-show fee, so I asked him since he was from Uber what is their Forrestville, MD Greenlight Hub address? He told me he was out of New York. I then asked him to verify my email address. He then told me I had to cancel the ride first. I then hung the phone up and cancelled the trip with a no-show fee.

But you would think that since Uber is aware of these scams, that they would send email alert out to all drivers. Duhhh! But that's if they cared!!!!!!!
 

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This happened to me about maybe 8 months ago I got a call after I accepted the request to pick up someone . I got a call from somebody pretending to be a uber representative he said and I quote: are you picking up Mark I said yes, he said I want you to go and cancel that trip and we'll give you a $50 credit I said okay, he then said I want you to pull over safely so I can speak to you about something I said all right so I pull over safely. I cancelled the ride and then he says I see you have a high rating here we just want to make sure that your rating is not fraudulent which was very weird then he said I just want you 2 text me your email and password to your account so he can give me the $50 and I almost did it I open the text app and as I was about to send the information I said wait a minute this can't be right then he said if you don't send me the information I'm going to suspend your account immediately. When he said that I almost send information again LOL and then I said wait a minute go ahead and suspended and I sat there for about 10 minutes and then it hit me it was a f****** scam but they almost got my eight hundred bucks and I would have been so livid I mean I would have been pissed but they almost got me and almost is like never!

For the record i want you to think about this. Only a driver or an employee of uber would know that you can select do not charge rider as an option. THAT IS A VERY SPECIFIC THING TO SAY Bingo!!! (INSIDE JOB) disgruntled employee or driver!
 

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This happened to me about maybe 8 months ago I got a call after I accepted the request to pick up someone . I got a call from somebody pretending to be a uber representative he said and I quote: are you picking up Mark I said yes, he said I want you to go and cancel that trip and we'll give you a $50 credit I said okay, he then said I want you to pull over safely so I can speak to you about something I said all right so I pull over safely. I cancelled the ride and then he says I see you have a high rating here we just want to make sure that your rating is not fraudulent which was very weird then he said I just want you 2 text me your email and password to your account so he can give me the $50 and I almost did it I open the text app and as I was about to send the information I said wait a minute this can't be right then he said if you don't send me the information I'm going to suspend your account immediately. When he said that I almost send information again LOL and then I said wait a minute go ahead and suspended and I sat there for about 10 minutes and then it hit me it was a f****** scam but they almost got my eight hundred bucks and I would have been so livid I mean I would have been pissed but they almost got me and almost is like never!

For the record i want you to think about this. Only a driver or an employee of uber would know that you can select do not charge rider as an option. THAT IS A VERY SPECIFIC THING TO SAY Bingo!!! (INSIDE JOB) disgruntled employee or driver!
At one time, when this scam first started, that may have been true. Now it's well-known and anyone can do it.
 

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U know i wish there was a uber Robin hood. Instead of hacking the election in Donald Trump favour(chuckle). hack uber bank account and then deposit couple billion $ in the driver's bank account. Now that type of hacking I'll cheer for.
 

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I'm smarter than everyone who has fallen for this lame scam. They are desperate for income and the threat of deactivation scares them. How smart are you if you give away your account info to someone via phone or text message? I have yet to hear of one instance where someone had their account drained because they did not give up their personal information. The reason these types of scams even exist is because there are stupid people in this world.
Sadly I have to agree. Unless you owe money, big companies that you have current business with calling a consumer to deal with you is very rare these days. The only examples I can think of are when a credit card is flagged for out of town/overseas use - and even my cards now do it via text message. Or client maintenance on an extremely high spender (which gets into the business side). I had an airline call me proactively with a better flight (due to their schedule changes) and I was like, "Wow you're actually calling me? that's great!" - that's how rare it is.

Or else it's smaller companies like your dentist confirming an appointment. The remainder of inbound calls to me, (like 95%) is just garbage like sales calls, spam, surveys, or scams. Which I ignore and block if repeated. Doing so has never adversely affected me or my finances.

I've never cashed out, just have my weekly transfer - and never had any problems.

Good rule of thumb: If you need to find a business or check out something then YOU be the one making the initial requests, rather than companies contacting you first. I was driving a couple to the airport and one party said "Oh some men were redoing driveways in the neighborhood and offered a quote...." - which is one of the biggest scams out there.
 

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Sorry buddy, but I do think I'm smarter than those hit. And if you think they're the brightest people you know, think again
Yep. I was one of the first people, they tried to scam. Same tactic, almost. I got the ping followed by an immediate cancellation. Then by a phone call from "uber-passsenger" number with bogus bonus offer. I managed to have them text me from their real phone number and immediately contacted Uber with the warning of this scam. Later that day I filed the complaint with FBI cyber crime division on-line. And guess, what? Neither ever called me back.
Then I went to that phishing website and and filled out about 20 fake logins and passwords just to waste their time. Then for days I trolled that guy, who called me with "where the ef is my bonus?" calls every couple of hours. Late night. He finally blocked my number. No worries. I posted his number on Craigslist with some rediculously cheap ad, so he, probably, got flooded with calls. I just love screwing with people.
 
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