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Total and complete nonsense , Uber and airbnb is best thing since sliced bread .Taking the money out of trump hotels,and his fat kat taxi slime bags,and putting in our bank accounts.If you do this full time you could pull 50k a year easy.
 

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Good article to read,I agree that Uber and Ab&b are great especially for traveling to other countries,What I would like to see what the taxi and hotel industry are going to do about it,sulk and complain or try to evolve and become competitive. I would like to see regulation on these companies in such that they get a nominal fee since the host or driver does most of the work.Also there is the issue of what is the next thing to become a shared economy? Trade professions?personal cooks?I'm sure some of these are in the works.
 

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What I don't like is how we are first taught how we should share our resources and utilize them better, and now that we do, and it displaces things like taxis and hotels, all of a sudden it is an issue, and we shouldn't share anymore?!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What I don't like is how we are first taught how we should share our resources and utilize them better, and now that we do, and it displaces things like taxis and hotels, all of a sudden it is an issue, and we shouldn't share anymore?!
It is called marketing and technology. I remember driving the head of marketing of Uber Eats in my car, she was always travelling back and forth to restaurants on Queen Street east, met her several times. She always asked me why I didn't do Eats, not enough money was my reply. She always kept doing the same refrain that Uber is disruptive, by about this time I had already become jaded that I wasn't truly making money.

The sharing economy was never sharing it was always purely over exploitive. I remember after driving this Uber zealot that I decided that it was the end. They were strangely enough exploited themselves and had no idea that their corporate climb was futile. Basically they were all in the taxi business but didn't realize it and they weren't even paid like taxi drivers.

The whole AirBNB thing I find particularly insidious in that it is now decimating housing stock in most major centres around the world with little or no regulation. Living in a tourist area I see the consequences first hand. Locals who work in retail, vineyards or service providing industry can no longer afford rents, if they can find monthly rental units at all. Rentiers don't want these people any more and have rapidly kicked them out over the last few years in favour of short term rentals. They don't even care that their properties are empty for the winters, they make more money overall in the tourist season and don't have the worry of long term tenants.

The shortage of people willing to work for minimum wage or just a little more is finite and employers are desperate but their is little they can do other than use foreign workers. Some businesses and trades are bringing in trailers for workers from Ottawa to live on site at construction sites.
Short term rentals are creating long term structural problems for small and large communities alike. The sharing economy is now a scourge we have to live with and or fight. It is the logical extension to Neoliberalism, it is now the new tool the rentier class will clobber all of us with whether we are even remotely related to it in one way or another.
 

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It is called marketing and technology. I remember driving the head of marketing of Uber Eats in my car, she was always travelling back and forth to restaurants on Queen Street east, met her several times. She always asked me why I didn't do Eats, not enough money was my reply. She always kept doing the same refrain that Uber is disruptive, by about this time I had already become jaded that I wasn't truly making money.

The sharing economy was never sharing it was always purely over exploitive. I remember after driving this Uber zealot that I decided that it was the end. They were strangely enough exploited themselves and had no idea that their corporate climb was futile. Basically they were all in the taxi business but didn't realize it and they weren't even paid like taxi drivers.

The whole AirBNB thing I find particularly insidious in that it is now decimating housing stock in most major centres around the world with little or no regulation. Living in a tourist area I see the consequences first hand. Locals who work in retail, vineyards or service providing industry can no longer afford rents, if they can find monthly rental units at all. Rentiers don't want these people any more and have rapidly kicked them out over the last few years in favour of short term rentals. They don't even care that their properties are empty for the winters, they make more money overall in the tourist season and don't have the worry of long term tenants.

The shortage of people willing to work for minimum wage or just a little more is finite and employers are desperate but their is little they can do other than use foreign workers. Some businesses and trades are bringing in trailers for workers from Ottawa to live on site at construction sites.
Short term rentals are creating long term structural problems for small and large communities alike. The sharing economy is now a scourge we have to live with and or fight. It is the logical extension to Neoliberalism, it is now the new tool the rentier class will clobber all of us with whether we are even remotely related to it in one way or another.
But by the same token, should I not say that taxis are bad because they overcharge for a service? or hotels? I don;t have air B&B (yet), but from uber perspective... I agree pay is waaaay too low to be playing taxi, but more than enough if you truly ride share (ie destination only). I personally use it mostly on destination, some weekends I go out and play taxi, but typically do not drive at all if there are no incentives.

Now let me ask you this... with advent of 3d printers, suppose I start making small screws or some other parts at cheaper rates and start charging much less than big screw factories. Would that be bad?, and what if someone came up with an solar panel generating , would it be bad if I started generating own power and thus displacing all the workers at the power plant?

Back in a day we had hitchhikers, it was a form of sharing economy, but because it was in small amounts no one cared much. The technology allowed for boost in numbers. Should banks now protest against "go fund me" type websites because people are able to obtain funds without borrowing from banks and thus not paying to banks? They all try to regulate crypto currencies all because someone, somewhere who used to make tons of money will not anymore.

I believe the only mistake some people make is they allow the sharing economy income to replace their jobs/desire to empower themselves to achieve more.

Not to mention people should really get on with understanding supply and demand. It not only applies to things like uber. When I read about IT, the IT people used to be high in demand, as time went on more and more people went into that sector. These days you can get developer for dirt cheap. What is more scarce these days are the trade jobs. You gotta keep that dynamic in mind, things will always change. You can't complain about uber/taxi just because in the past you used to make much more than you do now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
But by the same token, should I not say that taxis are bad because they overcharge for a service? or hotels? I don;t have air B&B (yet), but from uber perspective... I agree pay is waaaay too low to be playing taxi, but more than enough if you truly ride share (ie destination only). I personally use it mostly on destination, some weekends I go out and play taxi, but typically do not drive at all if there are no incentives.

Now let me ask you this... with advent of 3d printers, suppose I start making small screws or some other parts at cheaper rates and start charging much less than big screw factories. Would that be bad?, and what if someone came up with an solar panel generating , would it be bad if I started generating own power and thus displacing all the workers at the power plant?

Back in a day we had hitchhikers, it was a form of sharing economy, but because it was in small amounts no one cared much. The technology allowed for boost in numbers. Should banks now protest against "go fund me" type websites because people are able to obtain funds without borrowing from banks and thus not paying to banks? They all try to regulate crypto currencies all because someone, somewhere who used to make tons of money will not anymore.

I believe the only mistake some people make is they allow the sharing economy income to replace their jobs/desire to empower themselves to achieve more.

Not to mention people should really get on with understanding supply and demand. It not only applies to things like uber. When I read about IT, the IT people used to be high in demand, as time went on more and more people went into that sector. These days you can get developer for dirt cheap. What is more scarce these days are the trade jobs. You gotta keep that dynamic in mind, things will always change. You can't complain about uber/taxi just because in the past you used to make much more than you do now.
I think we need to stop thinking in terms of capitalism which I think we can all agree is no longer working for the good of the collective nor for the planet. The root causes of over exploitation be it humans or the natural world is that we don't question or take into account the out comes. Capitalism is and always has been a burden to either over come or use to its cruelest extremes. The most important question as we strive to come to terms with is a system, that no longer works for us or the planet and an self sustaining alternative. The select few who run the capitalists states and enterprises are so cocooned that they have no sense of the reality of the forces and changes that are taking place in peoples everyday lives.

The anger is palpable and real but more importantly ignored. A majority of millennials believe that socialism has merit and is an alternative to capitalism. That is good news except that we all now find ourselves on the precipice of serious climate disruption and the threat to civilization is already upon us. We'll hopefully make it through this summer here in the Northern hemisphere but the choice we face are stark. The fossil fuels we have already consumed could very well me are collective end as a civilization and possibly mass extinction. If there was ever a time to experiment that time is now.

 

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Not entirely true. Was head hunted constantly over the summer to work on various projects. The Eglinton LRT is in the midst of a full scale shortage of tradespeople. Some divisions of the project are on indefinite hold until these positions can be filled
Sorry, what I meant to say is that people who know trades are more scarce. Ie not enough supply of trade people. I hear something similar and see job postings for different trades. Kinda makes me thinking if I should learn one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Sorry, what I meant to say is that people who know trades are more scarce. Ie not enough supply of trade people. I hear something similar and see job postings for different trades. Kinda makes me thinking if I should learn one.
House framers here were charging 78 an hour last fall ( I had to hire one ) and I now hear they are charging 100 an hour for experienced framers. New house construction by a reputable contractor is a 2 to 3 year wait. People have resorted to manufactured houses built in a huge plant in Milton and than trucked to site. Cement slab is poured first and a crane is used to unload the pieces.
 

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We do have a lot of immigrants with advanced degrees and expertise form their home countries, but those degrees are considered to not meet western standards. Immigrants come to Canada using the point system in which education plays a huge component. However, the degrees that allowed them to immigrate here are deemed to be worthless once they get here. Or, they suffer from huge language barriers and that prevents them from attaining meaningful employment in their respective field. That's why you have guy's like Vish (self proclaimed best uber driver) with master's degree working in a dead end job. We have to do a better job to integrate skilled immigrants that immigrate via point system.
 

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We do have a lot of immigrants with advanced degrees and expertise form their home countries, but those degrees are considered to not meet western standards. Immigrants come to Canada using the point system in which education plays a huge component. However, the degrees that allowed them to immigrate here are deemed to be worthless once they get here. Or, they suffer from huge language barrier and therefore preventing them from attaining meaningful employment in their respective field. That's why you have guy's like Vish (self proclaimed best uber driver) with master's degree working in a dead end job. We have to do a better job to integrate skilled immigrants that immigrate via point system.
I believe language should be a requirement to get in. Personally I don't even like to take vacation in the countries where I don't speak the language. Just can't fully enjoy it. I can only imagine the struggle if you have to live/work somewhere without communication.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I believe language should be a requirement to get in. Personally I don't even like to take vacation in the countries where I don't speak the language. Just can't fully enjoy it. I can only imagine the struggle if you have to live/work somewhere without communication.
Language need not be a barrier anymore. Too many ways new to communicate.
 

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House framers here were charging 78 an hour last fall ( I had to hire one ) and I now hear they are charging 100 an hour for experienced framers. New house construction by a reputable contractor is a 2 to 3 year wait. People have resorted to manufactured houses built in a huge plant in Milton and than trucked to site. Cement slab is poured first and a crane is used to unload the pieces.
I'm trying to restore a century house and finding finish carpenters is the biggest obstacle. At least a year wait. None of the good ones can get anyone willing to work or even take on an apprenticeship.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I'm trying to restore a century house and finding finish carpenters is the biggest obstacle. At least a year wait. None of the good ones can get anyone willing to work or even take on an apprenticeship.
The siding companies and individuals can not find help, even starting at 25 an hour, landscaping companies now start here at 28 and hour, without experience. The biggest problem now is that many of the old timers pushing 60 and higher can no longer work in extreme heat conditions. In fact many have already decided to retire this year. Many are finishing up their final jobs. The wait for siding, facia, soffit and eves is approaching 2 years. The men that are still working will simply not work in extreme heat conditions.

The drywall guys are booked 6 months in advance and don't even answer their phones. They as well cannot find help even at 30 dollars an hour. Yes these are difficult and not the nicest jobs but these positions are now fraught with the problem of warmer than usual summers. The construction industry is facing a crisis. With our technology can we figure some way to keeep men cool when they work through the summer?
 

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The siding companies and individuals can not find help, even starting at 25 an hour, landscaping companies now start here at 28 and hour, without experience. The biggest problem now is that many of the old timers pushing 60 and higher can no longer work in extreme heat conditions. In fact many have already decided to retire this year. Many are finishing up their final jobs. The wait for siding, facia, soffit and eves is approaching 2 years. The men that are still working will simply not work in extreme heat conditions.

The drywall guys are booked 6 months in advance and don't even answer their phones. They as well cannot find help even at 30 dollars an hour. Yes these are difficult and not the nicest jobs but these positions are now fraught with the problem of warmer than usual summers. The construction industry is facing a crisis. With our technology can we figure some way to keeep men cool when they work through the summer?
I'm an Ironworker. Heat is terrible in the summer. We've adapted to starting work earlier in the morning (5-6 am) and leaving after 8 hours so we're only working for 1-2 hours in the extreme heat. Drywall's not really my trade, but I manage it myself because of the labour shortage, as well as basic plumbing/electrical.
Same as my area. Good firms are simply closing up shop. Entry level carpenters make $28/hr and you just can't find enough people who want to work. Landscape labourers start at $25/hr and are not taking jobs because of the same reason...there are no employees to be had!

The lesson learned here is that skilled labour cannot be adapted to the gig economy.....yet anyway
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I'm an Ironworker. Heat is terrible in the summer. We've adapted to starting work earlier in the morning (5-6 am) and leaving after 8 hours so we're only working for 1-2 hours in the extreme heat. Drywall's not really my trade, but I manage it myself because of the labour shortage, as well as basic plumbing/electrical.
Same as my area. Good firms are simply closing up shop. Entry level carpenters make $28/hr and you just can't find enough people who want to work. Landscape labourers start at $25/hr and are not taking jobs because of the same reason...there are no employees to be had!

The lesson learned here is that skilled labour cannot be adapted to the gig economy.....yet anyway
Every time I go with my trailer the yard manager approaches me offering me a job doing deliveries or in the yard itself. Right now some of the junior B hockey players are working but I know they won't last another heat wave, the next one is in 3 days. You now have to wait 2 or more days for a delivery.

The siding companies and individuals can not find help, even starting at 25 an hour, landscaping companies now start here at 28 and hour, without experience. The biggest problem now is that many of the old timers pushing 60 and higher can no longer work in extreme heat conditions. In fact many have already decided to retire this year. Many are finishing up their final jobs. The wait for siding, facia, soffit and eves is approaching 2 years. The men that are still working will simply not work in extreme heat conditions.

The drywall guys are booked 6 months in advance and don't even answer their phones. They as well cannot find help even at 30 dollars an hour. Yes these are difficult and not the nicest jobs but these positions are now fraught with the problem of warmer than usual summers. The construction industry is facing a crisis. With our technology can we figure some way to keeep men cool when they work through the summer?
I worked at a company that had profit sharing and I remember when it was first announced some of my co-workers thought it was not fair because if they worked harder than other employees it would mean they would be over contributing if they they were more efficient and diligent. We were German owned and many european companies have profit sharing plans. Something many employers don't have in North America. I was always struck at how much it contributed to my final company pension and certainly extra money I would probably have never put aside. That companies that have worker shortages don't employ some of these incentives is bewildering.

Why are Americans are so unimaginative? As labour shortages in the trades continue and as weather conditions become more extreme we will have to look at new approaches to compensation that go beyond hourly wages. Dare I say the word co-operatives.
 
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