Uber Drivers Forum banner
1 - 20 of 90 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a pre-trial program in which you have certain objectives to complete, once the objectives are completed, the charges are dropped and the case dismissed.

There are 2 components to the program: the 1st component involves an assigned counselor which monitors your progress through the program and is like a case manager. However, to satisfy the state the county also assigns a corrections officer (otherwise known as a probation officer) to your case EVEN though you're not technically on probation. There are different requirements, fees, and stipulations and sometimes the officer gets confused about what she ought to do on a case by case basis.

My problem only started when, last Friday, the officer assigned to my case called and asked if I had a regular driver's license or a state ID. I told her I had a regular driver's license. She then asked me for a number of someone at Uber she can get a hold of. I informed that that I rarely talk to anyone at Uber except support if I have issues with my account, and that there are also users who tweet their requests to the Uber twitter account. Meanwhile, I'm thinking why does she need this? "Well," she says "get me a number for someone I can contact there because they need to know about this." Of course, a million thoughts were filling my head but for the time I wanted to assure her I would cooperate with whatever she might be suggesting just so as not to upset her. After she gave me until Thursday to get her the number, I decided to look into her request because, honestly, I'm serving no sentence, had no conviction, and upon completing this optional program, my record stays as is and the charges will be dropped.

My first question to anyone who might know the answer is, regardless of whether or not she has the right to do this, if she contacts Uber saying, for example, that I'm on probation or some kind of court ordered program, could that affect my job with Uber in any way?

And my second question (which is more legal based) is, can she make me do this, period, considering I'm not on any actual probation and just completing a pre-trial program? The way she asked about my license at first when she called made me believe that she believes I'm on probation, although I'm not certain of that, just speculating.

So, for the TL;DR version: I'm on a pre-trial program, not probation. The officer (who normally does probation cases) assigned to me asked to call Uber and notify them of my legal issues. Assuming I'm an idiot and she does have the right tell Uber I'm on a drug court program (despite the fact I have no convictions, and my charges will be dropped at the end), is my job with Uber at risk?

HELP!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,008 Posts
This is a pre-trial program in which you have certain objectives to complete, once the objectives are completed, the charges are dropped and the case dismissed.

There are 2 components to the program: the 1st component involves an assigned counselor which monitors your progress through the program and is like a case manager. However, to satisfy the state the county also assigns a corrections officer (otherwise known as a probation officer) to your case EVEN though you're not technically on probation. There are different requirements, fees, and stipulations and sometimes the officer gets confused about what she ought to do on a case by case basis.

My problem only started when, last Friday, the officer assigned to my case called and asked if I had a regular driver's license or a state ID. I told her I had a regular driver's license. She then asked me for a number of someone at Uber she can get a hold of. I informed that that I rarely talk to anyone at Uber except support if I have issues with my account, and that there are also users who tweet their requests to the Uber twitter account. Meanwhile, I'm thinking why does she need this? "Well," she says "get me a number for someone I can contact there because they need to know about this." Of course, a million thoughts were filling my head but for the time I wanted to assure her I would cooperate with whatever she might be suggesting just so as not to upset her. After she gave me until Thursday to get her the number, I decided to look into her request because, honestly, I'm serving no sentence, had no conviction, and upon completing this optional program, my record stays as is and the charges will be dropped.

My first question to anyone who might know the answer is, regardless of whether or not she has the right to do this, if she contacts Uber saying, for example, that I'm on probation or some kind of court ordered program, could that affect my job with Uber in any way?

And my second question (which is more legal based) is, can she make me do this, period, considering I'm not on any actual probation and just completing a pre-trial program? The way she asked about my license at first when she called made me believe that she believes I'm on probation, although I'm not certain of that, just speculating.

So, for the TL;DR version: I'm on a pre-trial program, not probation. The officer (who normally does probation cases) assigned to me asked to call Uber and notify them of my legal issues. Assuming I'm an idiot and she does have the right tell Uber I'm on a drug court program (despite the fact I have no convictions, and my charges will be dropped at the end), is my job with Uber at risk?

HELP!
Yes your job would be at risk, however...

Her getting a hold of someone that listens to her will most likely not happen.

Here is a number to Uber. Give it to her and tell her good luck

‭(800) 593-7069‬
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,612 Posts
I would think that Uber might be able to suspend you until your case is resolved, one way or the other. if the charges are dropped, they have no basis to continue your suspension. If, for any reason, you don't complete your objectives and end up being found guilty, then you'll be permanently deactivated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,254 Posts
Kind of stupid on their part. A probation officer wants you to have a job. Sometimes they can violate you if you don't have one and aren't looking for one. Why the hell would she do something that could cause you to lose a job?

In theory the PO is supposed to be helping you stay out of jail and this doesn't sound like a good one. I had one once and he went out of his way to avoid causing me any problems or embarrassment in the free world.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
160 Posts
I would think that Uber might be able to suspend you until your case is resolved, one way or the other. if the charges are dropped, they have no basis to continue your suspension. If, for any reason, you don't complete your objectives and end up being found guilty, then you'll be permanently deactivated.
No one would suspend "The Suze".
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
60,633 Posts
This is a pre-trial program in which you have certain objectives to complete, once the objectives are completed, the charges are dropped and the case dismissed.

There are 2 components to the program: the 1st component involves an assigned counselor which monitors your progress through the program and is like a case manager. However, to satisfy the state the county also assigns a corrections officer (otherwise known as a probation officer) to your case EVEN though you're not technically on probation. There are different requirements, fees, and stipulations and sometimes the officer gets confused about what she ought to do on a case by case basis.

My problem only started when, last Friday, the officer assigned to my case called and asked if I had a regular driver's license or a state ID. I told her I had a regular driver's license. She then asked me for a number of someone at Uber she can get a hold of. I informed that that I rarely talk to anyone at Uber except support if I have issues with my account, and that there are also users who tweet their requests to the Uber twitter account. Meanwhile, I'm thinking why does she need this? "Well," she says "get me a number for someone I can contact there because they need to know about this." Of course, a million thoughts were filling my head but for the time I wanted to assure her I would cooperate with whatever she might be suggesting just so as not to upset her. After she gave me until Thursday to get her the number, I decided to look into her request because, honestly, I'm serving no sentence, had no conviction, and upon completing this optional program, my record stays as is and the charges will be dropped.

My first question to anyone who might know the answer is, regardless of whether or not she has the right to do this, if she contacts Uber saying, for example, that I'm on probation or some kind of court ordered program, could that affect my job with Uber in any way?

And my second question (which is more legal based) is, can she make me do this, period, considering I'm not on any actual probation and just completing a pre-trial program? The way she asked about my license at first when she called made me believe that she believes I'm on probation, although I'm not certain of that, just speculating.

So, for the TL;DR version: I'm on a pre-trial program, not probation. The officer (who normally does probation cases) assigned to me asked to call Uber and notify them of my legal issues. Assuming I'm an idiot and she does have the right tell Uber I'm on a drug court program (despite the fact I have no convictions, and my charges will be dropped at the end), is my job with Uber at risk?

HELP!
1.) we are not Lawyers
2.) any of us who are Lawyers do not know specific laws of your state.
3.) any Lawyers here who are approved for practice in your state and happen to be current in Criminal Code in your Jurisdiction do not work pro bono.
4)any Layers in your jurisdiction current on Criminal Code AND working pro bono
Will need you to sign a waiver of liability before being briefed on your specific case.
5.) even meeting all of the afore mentioned parameters and working a staff of paralegals overtime, we do not have sufficient forewarning to research your case and discover possible legal precedent within the parameters of your time frame.
So
Either a.) you are screwed.
Or
B.) you are asking the wrong people.
So in conclusion
It is not possible to give you legal council on Uber Forum.
Now
What you could do( although i neither advise in favor nor against)
Is give them the number to your closest Uber Greeenlight Hub.

P.s.- try to pass your urine & hair drug screens.

I don't know what her intentions are but she is potentially jeopardizing your gig with uber. Talk to a lawyer immediately.
Then she could violate him for not fulfiling the conditions of his non parole parole. By eliminating his job, then finding him in violation for not having a job.
Florida is a " Corporate Prison" state isnt it ?

Welcome to the Twilight Zone of the catch 22 catch 22.
The Hungry Legal " System" Beast must be fed.
Someone has stamped Hors D' oeurvres
On your case file.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,450 Posts
Kind of stupid on their part. A probation officer wants you to have a job. Sometimes they can violate you if you don't have one and aren't looking for one. Why the hell would she do something that could cause you to lose a job?

In theory the PO is supposed to be helping you stay out of jail and this doesn't sound like a good one. I had one once and he went out of his way to avoid causing me any problems or embarrassment in the free world.[/QUOTE
Sorry to burst your bubble and I hope you do the best in life . Pre trial is done by the state/county/city to save money. Probation is mandated by the court . If you still think your charges will be dropped then you should go to trial and not take the deal. The whole idea of pre trial/probation is you admit your mistake and you are afforded a second chance so you can learn from it.
For this very reason, If I want my family/friends to take a rideshare, I rather have them take lyft(they are shady for money) than uber. Lyft will never allow you on their platform.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,568 Posts
First, you don't have a job with Uber. You have a contract with Uber. You need to educate your court appointed officer or ask her to sign up with Uber with your referral code if she is interested to find out what Uber stands for like the rest of us.
2nd, If it's legal issue, she needs to contact Uber legal dept. or corporate legal council. Ask her to send her contact request to Uber PR Dept or corporate HQ or [building manager] to prove you're still thinking as strait as you can be.

First, you don't have a job with Uber. You have a contract with Uber. You need to educate your court appointed officer or ask her to sign up with Uber with your referral code if she is interested to find out what Uber stands for like the rest of us.
2nd, If it's legal issue, she needs to contact Uber legal dept. or corporate legal council. Ask her to send her contact request to Uber PR Dept or corporate HQ or [building manager] to prove you're still thinking as strait as you can be.
Lastly, give her your number and tell her when to call. Make sure you answer like, This is Uber partner ( or This is Uber Driver)so and so, how can I help you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,497 Posts
Uber is not your employer. You are an independent contractor. You are self employed.
This would be the only argument that there is. You are running your own business and that's that. Tell her you file taxes as a business owner not a employee. I would absolutely go to his or her supervisor and explain your case. A lawyer could give some free advice possibly?

If your forced, give them the number to Uber. Hopefully without calling from your phone and without your Uber password it causes a complete run around and the PO gives up. Good luck, it's a shame this happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,269 Posts
I don't know what her intentions are but she is potentially jeopardizing your gig with uber. Talk to a lawyer immediately.
I agree with talking to a lawyer.

But also why did OP say he worked for Uber? He doesn't - he's self employed.

If you're a ride share driver you are self enployeed. Uber is only a client.

A lawyer could give some free advice possibly?
This made me giggle...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Thanks to all of you for your advice, I am confident that I understand enough now to make an informed decision. I understand you're not lawyers or legal professionals (obviously) but I was just trying to ask other Uber people in the community to see what you would ultimately do in my position.

It still blows my mind how many catch-22s you get setup for in any such program. They want you to have a job but then go out of their way to make you and your employer uncomfortable enough to risk you losing yours. I guess if you're not working as a dishwasher for minimum wage at some hole in the wall with your boss having full knowledge of your legal history, they feel as though anything else would be too good for you.

It's a shame this happens to people all the time, and while I'm not completely innocent, I imagine there are a ton of people who had their lives ruined because a friend or acquaintance dropped their weed stash in the crack of the passenger seat.

Or you could be like me, just a guy who had a 2 year old prescription for klonopin sitting in his medicine cabinet that he didn't need anymore. That is, until your mother who was riddled with cancer for 10 years passes away and you find that half your prescribed daily dose from before helped ease the grief a little. You know it's addictive, and you decide to only use it for a week and not see the doctor for a refill. Two days later while visiting your dad, you get in an argument with him because he doesn't see how forcing an old woman with cancer to board a plane for an 8 hour trip she neither had the strength nor the will to undertake, against the advice of both hospice and her oncologist, might have ultimately accelerated her death. Next thing you know, your dad pins you up against a wall and you push him out of the way to escape. The next day you visit him again to take the high road with an apology, and shortly after entering the house the police arrive and you're in cuffs for domestic battery. They search your pockets and find your daily 2 pill dose of klonopin. I say nothing, and of course the battery charge gets dropped even quicker than my remorseful father could ask for it to be dropped himself. Meanwhile, you're left with a felony drug charge for a medicine you used to take but stopped going to the doctor for because you didn't need it anymore. I had no prior record of any kind.

I was advised by my attorney that because the prescription is more than 6 months old, it would be inadvisable to take it to trial, and was left with either accepting probation with adjudication withheld (with the option to seal and expunge), or, a 12 month drug court program with daily urine drops, mandated 4 times a week 12-step program attendance and mandated 3 times a week group attendance. I've been in the program for 3 months, passed all the urine tests and kept up with the objectives. That's when the officer called asking me for "Uber's number" because "they need to know about this."

-Glitch
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,612 Posts
Thanks to all of you for your advice, I am confident that I understand enough now to make an informed decision. I understand you're not lawyers or legal professionals (obviously) but I was just trying to ask other Uber people in the community to see what you would ultimately do in my position.

It still blows my mind how many catch-22s you get setup for in any such program. They want you to have a job but then go out of their way to make you and your employer uncomfortable enough to risk you losing yours. I guess if you're not working as a dishwasher for minimum wage at some hole in the wall with your boss having full knowledge of your legal history, they feel as though anything else would be too good for you.

It's a shame this happens to people all the time, and while I'm not completely innocent, I imagine there are a ton of people who had their lives ruined because a friend or acquaintance dropped their weed stash in the crack of the passenger seat.

Or you could be like me, just a guy who had a 2 year old prescription for klonopin sitting in his medicine cabinet that he didn't need anymore. That is, until your mother who was riddled with cancer for 10 years passes away and you find that half your prescribed daily dose from before helped ease the grief a little. You know it's addictive, and you decide to only use it for a week and not see the doctor for a refill. Two days later while visiting your dad, you get in an argument with him because he doesn't see how forcing an old woman with cancer to board a plane for an 8 hour trip she neither had the strength nor the will to undertake, against the advice of both hospice and her oncologist, might have ultimately accelerated her death. Next thing you know, your dad pins you up against a wall and you push him out of the way to escape. The next day you visit him again to take the high road with an apology, and shortly after entering the house the police arrive and you're in cuffs for domestic battery. Of course, the charge gets dropped, but meanwhile you're left with a felony drug charge for a medicine you used to take but stopped going to the doctor for because you didn't need it anymore.

I was advised by my attorney that because the prescription is more than 6 months old, it would be inadvisable to take it to trial, and was left with either accepting probation with adjudication withheld (with the option to seal and expunge), or, a 12 month drug court program with daily urine drops, mandated 4 times a week 12-step program attendance and mandated 3 times a week group attendance. I've been in the program for 3 months, passed all the urine tests and kept up with the objectives. That's when the officer called asking me for "Uber's number" because "they need to know about this."

-Glitch
This sounds like a plea bargain, which is a Guilty Plea. They'll tell you it's a lesser charge, and it is, but once you're found guilty, anyone with a right and valid interest in it, like an employer or business "partner" (like Uber/Lyft) will also have the right to know the original charge.

You're most likely done with rideshare and many other career possibilities (that you may or may not be interested in or otherwise qualified for, I don't know) if you do this.

It will probably keep you out of jail and/or substantially lower your fines, though.
 
1 - 20 of 90 Posts
Top