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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm posting this with the aim of possibly saving others the frustration, time and expense I have experienced. My intent here is to not rant. This is intended primarily for those who have medical conditions which may be borderline with respect to the med exam requirements. There's not a lot of information out there.

I suffered a mild brain injury in November, am far down the road to recovery, and was actually encouraged to pursue driving for uber and/or lyft as I transition back to normal employment. What I've learned:

  1. Nationally uber and lyft encourage people with disabilities to pursue driving. It's often a fine option for person who might otherwise find themselves among the 70% that are disabled and unemployed. It's also good PR as they navigate other disability related issues.
  2. The question of "medically fit to drive" for a transportation network company is complex and evolving for the individual, the regulatory bodies, and probably 98% of the medical professionals you might encounter.
  3. Colorado is apparently ahead of the curve with PUC TNC med exam requirement but my guess is other states are not far behind.
  4. Colorado's TNC med exam requirements is modeled in some respects after well established guidelines published by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and generally followed by the state DOTS.
  5. This linkage is not advertised and your average family doctor, nurse practioner or even a Occupational Therapist who specializes in Driving Rehab may not realize that the FMCSA is where they should turn for guidance.
Recommendations:

If your disabled, and ask a medical professional for input on driving for uber/lyft, its likely that they may not much to say because at first glance, they may think that have no official guidance. You may need craft your question with "similar to a FMCSA/CDL" context.

If your newly disabled, and struggling with the question "am I fit to drive for uber/lyft," you will find a wealth of information on the FMCSA website.

Another positive step: Have an Occupational Therapist certified in driving rehab do an assessment on you, and explaining to them that FMCSA/CDL med exam context.

Finally, if you have a medical condition that may put in a gray area, consider going to a clinic that specializes in DOT/CDL/FMCSA exams. I suspect Uber's in-house exam option fits here but can't confirm. I went to a Little Clinic with the uber coupon and frankly got lucky. The NP just happened to FMCSA exam experience. It wasn't till then that I learned about the FMCSA and its guidance. Unfortunately I learned that I needed to wait a year and have a full neuro exam and testing assessment re-done then.
 

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I'm posting this with the aim of possibly saving others the frustration, time and expense I have experienced. My intent here is to not rant. This is intended primarily for those who have medical conditions which may be borderline with respect to the med exam requirements. There's not a lot of information out there.

I suffered a mild brain injury in November, am far down the road to recovery, and was actually encouraged to pursue driving for uber and/or lyft as I transition back to normal employment. What I've learned:

  1. Nationally uber and lyft encourage people with disabilities to pursue driving. It's often a fine option for person who might otherwise find themselves among the 70% that disabled and unemployed. It's also good PR as they navigate other disability related issues.
  2. The question of "medically fit to drive" for a transportation network company is complex and evolving both for the individual, the regulatory bodies, and probably 98% of the medical professionals you might encounter.
  3. Colorado is apparently ahead of the curve with PUC TNC med exam requirement but my guess is other states are not behind.
  4. Colorado's TNC med exam requirements is modeled in some respects after well established guidelines published by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and generally followed by the state DOTS.
  5. This linkage is not advertised and your average family doctor, nurse practioner or even a Occupational Therapist who specializes in Driving Rehab may not realize that the FMCSA is where should turn for guidance.
Recommendations:

If your disabled, and ask a medical professional for input on driving for uber/lyft, its likely that they may not much to say because at first glance, they may think that have no official guidance. You may need craft your question with "similar to a FMCSA/CDL" context.

If your newly disabled, and struggling with the question "am I fit to drive for uber/lyft," you will find a wealth of information on the FMCSA website.

Another positive step: Have an Occupational Therapist certified in driving rehab do an assessment on you, and explaining to them that FMCSA/CDL med exam context.

Finally, if you have a medical condition that may put in a gray area, consider going to a clinic that specializes in DOT/CDL/FMCSA exams. I suspect Uber's in-house exam option fits here but can't. I went to a Little Clinic with the uber coupon and frankly got lucky. The NP just happened to FMCSA exam experience. It wasn't till then that I learned about the FMCSA and its guidance. Unfortunately I learned that I needed to wait a year and have a full neuro exam and testing assessment re-done then.
This is great information and I appreciate you taking the time to post this! Personally I have a disability and require driving with a service dog. I had no problems passing the exam at the Denver Uber office even though there was a gray area. The doctor (who really is a chiropractor) who administered my exam just asked a few extra questions, none offensive or out of line, he was very professional and I was approved to drive. Btw most my pax love my service dog. My 5* feedback is more about her than me! I've also had pax fight over who sits in front with my little Mattie. It's amusing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I respect your opinion. I would note that I did not take this decision lightly. I sought out a formal driving assessment as recommended by my neurologist before getting behind the wheel. I even traded my car in on a new subaru with the Eyesight safety package. One thing I should emphasize ... brain injuries cover a very wide spectrum and are no definitive tests of the driving risks. The F.M.C.S.A. guidelines are rigorous, risk-based, and based on what research is available. In my case they prescribe waiting one year followed by a full neuro workup and formal driving assessment, then repeating both annually thereafter. I'm good with that ... just wish I could learn of it sooner.

I'd also encourage anyone reading this to put them self in my shoes. I'm the breadwinner in the family and face many obstacles -- some rooted people's "not feeling comfy" in hiring or working with someone who is disabled. On this I believe uber and lyft have the opportunity to do some real good.
 
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