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Per Scotty's sound advice:
All 2nd Generation Prius Owners should immediately Sell their car if has less than 130,000 b/c a $1k-$5k Repair Bill is coming soon!

So...
**Great News! I can make you a Cash offer for your "Lemon." You can send your Prius info via PM. (Yr.,Trim,Miles,Title Status,Pics,etc)
 

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Meh. I ran a Camry Hybrid from 222k to 347k with no repairs. 125,000 miles with just maintenance items - brake rotors, pads, filters and oil. I didn't even change the spark plugs; just regapped them when the engine started pinging.

It's like any other car....its when there's a problem.... not if
Correct, the indestructible, runs forever car has not yet been invented.
 

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Scotty is overstating quite a few things in this video, but I'll focus on the $5,900 claim to repair the motor generator assembly, because that's the worst one--

1. The Prius motor generator assembly has an extremely low reported rate of failure. It's almost unheard of, especially after Gen1. Toyota keeps on improving the motor generator each year and each generation. There are two motor generators in a Prius-- designated as MG1 and MG2. Almost all of the reported failures of the motor generator assembly is with the MG2, which makes sense, because it's the motor generator that gets the most work.

2. The MG2 can be replaced by a shop on its own for between $1,800-$2,500. A new MG2 is about $1,200 and it takes about 5 hours to replace. You do not have to replace the entire transaxle just because the MG2 goes out, which is how Scotty gets to his $5,900 clickbaity figure. A dealership would replace the entire transaxle to fix the issue, but it's complete overkill and why you don't take older cars to a dealership for repairs.

3. The engine and transmission do not need to be removed to replace the MG2, you would only have to do that when you're replacing the entire transaxle, which (see point 2) is overkill. The MG2 can be replaced right from the wheel well.

4. A Prius is going to save most people between 3-5 cents per mile in fuel costs, so even in the unlikely event that the motor generator did fail, it would pay for itself in about 50,000 miles. So yes, buying and driving an older Prius is a gamble, but you're hedging that gamble with fuel savings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Scotty is overstating quite a few things in this video, but I'll focus on the $5,900 claim to repair the motor generator assembly, because that's the worst one--

1. The Prius motor generator assembly has an extremely low reported rate of failure. It's almost unheard of, especially after Gen1. Toyota keeps on improving the motor generator each year and each generation. There are two motor generators in a Prius-- designated as MG1 and MG2. Almost all of the reported failures of the motor generator assembly is with the MG2, which makes sense, because it's the motor generator that gets the most work.

2. The MG2 can be replaced by a shop on its own for between $1,800-$2,500. A new MG2 is about $1,200 and it takes about 5 hours to replace. You do not have to replace the entire transaxle just because the MG2 goes out, which is how Scotty gets to his $5,900 clickbaity figure. A dealership would replace the entire transaxle to fix the issue, but it's complete overkill and why you don't take older cars to a dealership for repairs.

3. The engine and transmission do not need to be removed to replace the MG2, you would only have to do that when you're replacing the entire transaxle, which (see point 2) is overkill. The MG2 can be replaced right from the wheel well.

4. A Prius is going to save most people between 3-5 cents per mile in fuel costs, so even in the unlikely event that the motor generator did fail, it would pay for itself in about 50,000 miles. So yes, buying and driving an older Prius is a gamble, but you're hedging that gamble with fuel savings.
The flaw in your entire arguement is that any mere mechanical part can and will fail....
The muh toyota agreement is invalid
 

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The flaw in your entire arguement is that any mere mechanical part can and will fail....
The muh toyota agreement is invalid
I never said that the motor generator assembly could never fail. I said that it has an extremely low reported rate of failure, especially after Gen1. I'm sure that every single Toyota MG will eventually fail, but what is eventually? 300,000 miles? 500,000 miles? 1 million miles? More?

During that time, the fuel savings hedge against the repair costs. Say I owned a Prius and I drove it 300,000 miles and the MG2 failed and I had it replaced for $2,500. I've also saved $9,000 in fuel costs during those 300,000 miles (which is a very conservative estimate @ 3 cpm savings), so I'm still $6,500 to the good.

That's why Scotty has to inflate the price of the repair, because his financial argument doesn't make since if he doesn't.
 
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Scotty is overstating quite a few things in this video
In every video I've seen, he does this. He always has an axe to grind (usually about particular brands, but in this case about a particular model of car).

It makes it really hard to trust his actual expertise, since he always peppers his commentary with hyperbole and bias.

But telling people not to repair their own hybrid batteries without appropriate expertise is probably good advice. All the disclaimers about Prius repair usually say "you can kill yourself if you do this wrong" and I think it bears repeating.
 

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Then do it based on actual averages....
Battery averaged cost 4k
Generator average 3-5k
At the 2:40 mark in the video, Scotty tells the story of a guy who bought a Prius with 140,000 miles on it for $1,500 and then the motor generator went out on it. If the guy replaces the motor generator and pays the top end shop price of $2,500, then he has a Prius with 140,000 miles on it and a brand new motor generator for $4,000.

That's not a cautionary tale, that's an awesome opportunity. Sign me up. I'd love to find a deal like that. It sounds like the perfect Ubermobile to me. I'd have the purchase price and the price of the repair paid off just in fuel savings in less than 100,000 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
At the 2:40 mark in the video, Scotty tells the story of a guy who bought a Prius with 140,000 miles on it for $1,500 and then the motor generator went out on it. If the guy replaces the motor generator and pays the top end shop price of $2,500, then he has a Prius with 140,000 miles on it and a brand new motor generator for $4,000.

That's not a cautionary tale, that's an awesome opportunity. Sign me up. I'd love to find a deal like that. It sounds like the perfect Ubermobile to me. I'd have the purchase price and the price of the repair paid off just in fuel savings in less than 100,000 miles.
It's called opportunity cost and it's not the greatest in this case
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
How so? Be specific. Opportunity cost is expressed as a mathematical formula. You're making the claim, so let's see your math.
Show math on the probability of a car suffering a catastrophic failure.... really.....I would suggest Google put visiting a junk yard
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
It's not worth the paper it's printed on if you can't express opportunity cost mathematically. It doesn't get any easier than that.
Do you even comprehend what you're saying.... and no I don't mean that as an insult.....

Any vehicle purchased with 150k miles is purchased .... you know never mind....I insulted the almighty chit machine aka rolling road block
 
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